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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just replaced the chain. The old 11-32 cassette causes the chain to skip. The LBS handed me an 11-34, something I wanted to try anyway - Do I have to add some links to the new chain? Should I add some links to the chain? Thanks.
 

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bang
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personally, i wouldn't worry about it. it's not like you'll ever end up in the big-big combo anyway. if you want to play it safe though, you can size the chain normally (loop it over the big ring and largest rear cog without running it through the rear derailer, and add one full link).
 

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Cyco-Dude said:
personally, i wouldn't worry about it. it's not like you'll ever end up in the big-big combo anyway. if you want to play it safe though, you can size the chain normally (loop it over the big ring and largest rear cog without running it through the rear derailer, and add one full link).
Shimano says to go big, big plus two links. FWIW.
 

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I think you are both saying the same thing. The Park Tool repair website says TWO links (two rivets):

Chain Sizing - Largest Cog and Largest Chainring Method
An alternative method for determining chain length for new chains is to use the largest size sprockets on the bike. It is easiest to size the chain without threading it through the derailleur.

Remove the old chain.
Shift the front derailleur over the largest chainring, and the rear derailleur on the smallest cog.
Thread the new chain through the front derailleur. It is not necessary to thread the chain through the rear derailleur at this point. Simply wrap the chain around the largest front chainring and around the largest rear cog.
Pull the chain tight, and note the closest rivet where the two could be joined. Keep in mind a chain can only be joined by mating inner and outer plates.
From the closet rivet, lengthen the chain by counting over an additional two rivets (two links), which is a distance of one-inch. Cut the chain at this point.
Remove the chain from the bike and thread it through both derailleurs and join the ends.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone. I checked out the size of the 11-32 chain and, well, it was a lot shorter than I had expected. Not that I ever use the big chain ring much but I just felt better putting on a new chain that was sized right. Now, if I could only find the short piece of chain I kept when I sized the chain with the old 11-32, I'd be all set with a real spare... Thanks, again.
 

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Nothing like a new chain anyway

cjbiiv said:
Thanks everyone. I checked out the size of the 11-32 chain and, well, it was a lot shorter than I had expected. Not that I ever use the big chain ring much but I just felt better putting on a new chain that was sized right. Now, if I could only find the short piece of chain I kept when I sized the chain with the old 11-32, I'd be all set with a real spare... Thanks, again.
Chains are cheap and a fresh one on your ride is always a great way to start a new season.
 

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ravingbikefiend
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I've always used the 2 link / rivet rule.
 

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FYI -- one link of chain has holes for three pins, two actual pins, one set of outer links, one set of inners.
 

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ravingbikefiend
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Yep...there's nothing like a new chain and the old two link rule worked well when I set up the 2 by 7 on my new cross bike and installed a fresh SRAM PC68.

I always keep the extra links for repairs/ modifications.
 

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I have a Shimano drive train, and went from 11-32 to 11-34 without adding links works great.

I would carefully try it by hand big to big, watch the angle of the rd chain tensioner.

Bet it all works.
 
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