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hey all,

I'm planning on trying my first 100 miler in May (Victoria's 100 at Mansfield, Ontario) and was wondering about what/where to carry supplies. It's set as 2 big laps with a couple of drop places.

Why questions are what to carry and camelback or seatbag + jersey pockets?
 

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I do the Shenandoah Mountain 100 every year. I usually run a flask of hammer gel, 70oz bladder and 1 bottle of infinite nutrition. They have aid stations for refueling.
 

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It depends so much on the number of aid stations, and how well they are stocked. For the Cascade Creampuff, I carry very little, since the aid stations come about every 10 or 15 miles, and are amazingly well-stocked with free stuf, and mechanical help. For the Butte 100, I carry more, since the aid stations are a bit further apart, and not quite as well stocked.
 

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Two spare tires, a few SRAM power links, multi tool, pot, co2 air tool with 2 cartriges - all in seat bag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There are 7 feed zones over the course w/ water, food, tubes and pumps.

Seems fairly well stocked. I'd prefer to not carry a pack and was wondering how other folks have their rigs set up.

pics?
 

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Regardless of the race distance or the reputation of the promoter, I never count on having anything available at an aid station. I've seen too many aid stations with just water, if that, by the time I get there. Besides, unless they're stocking whatever nutrition products you know work for you, who cares if they've got an unlimited supply of XYZ drink or gels or bars, when you know your stomach can't handle XYZ and must have ABC... or whatever.

As a general rule, I carry enough fluid to get me, not to the next aid station, but two aid stations down the line, as well as all the solid food I think I'll eat (not much, BTW) and powder'd drink mix in ziploc baggies so I can mix my own energy drink. As for tools/parts, well... as long as I've got a reasonable expectation of being able to walk out or catch a ride out, I don't carry much more than a multi-tool, a quicklink, chaintool, and derailleur hanger. Oh, yeah... and two BIG CO2 cartridges and one tube.

If I've got my own support who'll be at the aid station, everything changes to a very minimalist approach.

Mudge
 

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mudge said:
... I never count on having anything available at an aid station. ... who cares if they've got an unlimited supply of XYZ drink or gels or bars, when you know your stomach can't handle XYZ and must have ABC...I carry enough fluid to get me, not to the next aid station, but two aid stations down the line, as well as all the solid food I think I'll eat (not much, BTW)... as long as I've got a reasonable expectation of being able to walk out or catch a ride out, I don't carry much more than a multi-tool, a quicklink, chaintool, and derailleur hanger.
Spot on -- great rationale.

My variations on this theme are two inner-tubes (seat bag), multi-tool (seat bag), a couple of chain links (seat bag), $20 (you never know!, seat bag), a functional min-pump attached to the frame, a one liter hydration bladder in middle back pocket of jersey (with drinking tube clipped to jersey zipper), a Shower's Pass Gortex riding jacket in left side back pocket (can winter a Wyoming blizzard in it if I have to and it packs small and light), all the food I'm going to need in the right side back pocket (about 8 Cliff Shots in two gel flasks, maybe a powerbar), and two big water bottles on the frame. I almost always only hit up every other aid station in the races I do. I don't use hydration drinks with sugar anymore, just spike one of the bottles with an electrolyte tablet.
 

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two bottles, one fuel/electrolite on the frame, one water on the handle bar (which is rare to see one on the handle bar) no camel back too much sweat in the shorts, gel flask and cliff bars though I am experimenting with infinite. I have an iron stomach so I can eat anything and do well. one tube, two co2, two gold links, derailer hanger in a small seat bag, cannondale headset multi tool, and Burt's bees chapstick which is better than sex when the lips get dry in a jersey pocket!!

This is assuming you have a well stocked check every 2 to 3 hours. 300 calories and 25oz of liquid an hour works well below 80F. Tank up at checks and leave out with two full bottles and whatever food is available just keep eating and drinking at least every 20 minutes.
 

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shiggy said:
HC100 is well supported. Basically 5 aid stations so figure on carrying what you normally would for a 25 miles/3-4hour ride and restock.
Thanks shiggy. I will have to figure this out in training. I don't usually eat much on solo 25 milers ... but that is another story. It looks like I need to try out Perpetuem or Heed to see if I can stomach em?
 

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AC/BC said:
Two spare tires, a few SRAM power links, multi tool, pot, co2 air tool with 2 cartriges - all in seat bag.
How much pot do you carry with you to last 100 miles? :ihih:
 

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mudge said:
Regardless of the race distance or the reputation of the promoter, I never count on having anything available at an aid station. I've seen too many aid stations with just water, if that, by the time I get there. Besides, unless they're stocking whatever nutrition products you know work for you, who cares if they've got an unlimited supply of XYZ drink or gels or bars, when you know your stomach can't handle XYZ and must have ABC... or whatever.

As a general rule, I carry enough fluid to get me, not to the next aid station, but two aid stations down the line, as well as all the solid food I think I'll eat (not much, BTW) and powder'd drink mix in ziploc baggies so I can mix my own energy drink. As for tools/parts, well... as long as I've got a reasonable expectation of being able to walk out or catch a ride out, I don't carry much more than a multi-tool, a quicklink, chaintool, and derailleur hanger. Oh, yeah... and two BIG CO2 cartridges and one tube.

If I've got my own support who'll be at the aid station, everything changes to a very minimalist approach.

Mudge
I would have to agree with this approach especially if you have never done the particular event or don't know how well it is supported. I have arrived at an aid station in the past on a 100 degree+ day to find it out of water.....I'm glad I had extra liquid in my Camelbak to continue on.....others were not so lucky.....
 

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mudge said:
Regardless of the race distance or the reputation of the promoter, I never count on having anything available at an aid station. I've seen too many aid stations with just water, if that, by the time I get there. Besides, unless they're stocking whatever nutrition products you know work for you, who cares if they've got an unlimited supply of XYZ drink or gels or bars, when you know your stomach can't handle XYZ and must have ABC... or whatever.

As a general rule, I carry enough fluid to get me, not to the next aid station, but two aid stations down the line, as well as all the solid food I think I'll eat (not much, BTW) and powder'd drink mix in ziploc baggies so I can mix my own energy drink. As for tools/parts, well... as long as I've got a reasonable expectation of being able to walk out or catch a ride out, I don't carry much more than a multi-tool, a quicklink, chaintool, and derailleur hanger. Oh, yeah... and two BIG CO2 cartridges and one tube.

If I've got my own support who'll be at the aid station, everything changes to a very minimalist approach.

Mudge
This is crazy talk. Don't scare the crap out of the guy before his first race.

OP you might want to ask your question on the forum for the actual race you are going to do, or contact the promoter and ask him to have a few guys call you and discuss the race.

True, some races are sketchy on the dependability of the aid stations, but others, like the Creampuff, are not only good for just about any kind of food you like, but you can even get a burger at a couple of aid stations if you're really in trouble!

I generally try and supply nearly all of my own personal favorite drink concoction, and figure one brand of energy gel is pretty similar to another. I don't find the different gels to be much of a stomach issue, UNLIKE THE DRINKS WHICH DEFINITELY CAN MESS WITH THE BOD!
 

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Kosmo:

While I agree The Puff, HC100 and many other races are very high quality, well run events with well stocked aid stations and roving trail help but you can never substitute for being prepared and being personally responsible for yourself during an event. I certainly do not advise carrying everything including the kitchen sink with you but if it is hot you should over estimate needed liquids, rocky, over estimate CO2, etc. The race on the 100+ degree day I referred to above occurred during an event organized by a highly respected and organized race promotor who unfortunately had a bad day and did not estimate the hydration needs of the race. It can happen and each racer should be prepared for reasonable circumstances......the theme of this is not to scare a person out for his/her first 100 but to educate that no matter how good the race is, you are ultimately responsible for your well being.
 

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mtbne1 said:
Kosmo:

While I agree The Puff, HC100 and many other races are very high quality, well run events with well stocked aid stations and roving trail help but you can never substitute for being prepared and being personally responsible for yourself during an event. I certainly do not advise carrying everything including the kitchen sink with you but if it is hot you should over estimate needed liquids, rocky, over estimate CO2, etc. The race on the 100+ degree day I referred to above occurred during an event organized by a highly respected and organized race promotor who unfortunately had a bad day and did not estimate the hydration needs of the race. It can happen and each racer should be prepared for reasonable circumstances......the theme of this is not to scare a person out for his/her first 100 but to educate that no matter how good the race is, you are ultimately responsible for your well being.
All good, fair points. I just thought the earlier response was a bit over-dramatic. To a great extent, you ARE responsible for yourself. OTOH, at over $200 for a lot of these races now, you can rightfully expect to receive the support that is advertised on the race website.

My rule of thumb is to figure out what level of support a given race provides through a combination of their website, talking to other racers, and personal experience. Then I plan on receiving slightly less support than that.

For example, I race the Creampuff nearly "naked", but carry a fair amount of crap for the Butte 100, because it offers slightly less support, and in a much less organized manner. At the Puff, the volunteers get you what you need at the aid stations RIGHT FREAKING NOW, while at the Butte 100, everybody is a bit newer at the game, and a bit slower.

OP, I hope that helps. Lots of great endurance racers on this site, with a lot of good advice. Other than gear ideas, my best advice for your first 100 is to plan to finish, not really race it. If it goes well, do another, and actually race it!
 

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Thanks shiggy. I will have to figure this out in training. I don't usually eat much on solo 25 milers ... but that is another story. It looks like I need to try out Perpetuem or Heed to see if I can stomach em?
And Hammer Gel. Mike is trying to have flasks at the ASs.
Working out the food is key. Start early and often. Restock quickly at the aid.

As far as fluids and tools/spares it is the same as a 3 hour ride.
 

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kosmo said:
All good, fair points. I just thought the earlier response was a bit over-dramatic. To a great extent, you ARE responsible for yourself. OTOH, at over $200 for a lot of these races now, you can rightfully expect to receive the support that is advertised on the race website.
Kosmo,

The OP didn't ask us to give him your pack list, he asked for our pack lists. I gave him mine. Wasn't trying to scare him w/ an over-dramatization before his first race, just trying to make sure he can complete his first race and come back for a second, and third, and so on...

Mudge
 
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