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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
VERY long story, short: I was obsessed with mtb'ing in 2006. Began racing in 2007/2008. Raced for a few years. Suffered a back injury. Had to stop riding. Fast forward to late 2018, I'm back on the saddle. Man, did I miss this.

In '06, I purchased a Giant Trance 2. Nothing is original, except the frame. I was racing and riding XTR for a while, then I switched over to SRAM X.0. It's paired with a Noir crankset, Magura Marta SL brakes, Easton carbon handlebar, seatpost, nice wheelset, Fox R in the back, Marzocchi Marathon SL (rebuilt few months ago) and I'm probably forgetting a few things. It weighs right around 26lbs or so.

This bike was the **** back in the day. It still rides really well. Sure, some parts are tired and what not, but it's been given a clean bill of health.

Here is my question: Does a present day Trance or similar XC/trail bike crap all over my old Trance? Is today's SLX superior to 2007's XTR? Also, it seems like today's bikes have MUCH more travel. My Trance has 100-120mm of travel up front, and 100mm out back. I think today's Trance has 140 at both ends?!

Thanks very much in advance for helping me bridge a big gap in time and bringing me up to speed.

-Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. Maybe should have added a sentence about what sufficient means and what kind of riding I'll be doing.

Competitive level performance for casual riding. I won't be racing again. The reason for wanting that kinda stuff is I can appreciate the difference between levels of componentry. It's part of the enjoyment for me.

Thanks again
 

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The main change I found coming back into it 3 years ago is the different types of bike. XC, Trail, Enduro.... then the mixes - XC/Trail (sort of in between) and Trail/Enduro (again, in between). Then you have 27.5" wheels or 29". 26" is dead (for most at least).

I'd ride your current bike, check out GMBN or similar on YouTube (to get up to speed) and if you are sure you are getting back into it, figure out what type of riding you want to do and buy the correct type of bike. I rushed back in and bought the wrong type of bike and ended up wasting a lot of money!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. Good advice. Yes, I was surprised by the number of types of bikes and applications (XC/trail/enduro/etc). I'll check out GMBN. Will try to get more up to speed.

Aside from getting the wrong type of bike (sorry to hear! appreciate you paying it forward), did you notice big improvements in frame geometry, component quality and performance, suspension improvements, etc?
 

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Yes, geometry is completely different, but I noticed even it more when I got the right bike this year. Modern bikes have got quite a bit quicker. My mistake was that I didn't take my time to figure out what had changed.
 

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I mean, your bike hasn't really changed. If it was sufficient before, it'll be sufficient now.

You've certainly changed in the meantime with your injury, recovery from it, and the general aging process. Sounds like your reasons/motivations have changed, too.

I'd say just keep getting out there and riding what you've got. If you've got a hankering to get something new, especially if you're developing some interest in styles of riding that your current bike is less than ideal for, go ahead and start doing some research on the new stuff that's out there.
 

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I agree with the idea of riding what you have until you decide what you want. I have ridden a bunch of modern bikes at various demo days, but haven't found that any of them was a big enough difference to me to invest in one, so I continue to buy used bikes that are a generation or two behind the current ones as people upgrade to the newest bikes.

As far as components go, my last bike came with 1x11 XX1 drivetrain and Project 321 wheels and I downgraded to a drivetrain and wheels that were less expensive to maintain and replace. I have noted virtually no difference in performance after a couple of thousand trail miles.

I liked my 2005 Trance 1, but I have moved on from 26" primarily because of a lack of availability of tires and not due to a lack of travel. My last FS bike was a Niner Jet 9 with the same travel as my Trance had. Now I primarily ride 29'er hard tails.
 

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Sufficient for what? Having a good time on the trails? Sure. I'd recommend getting back into riding for a while and make your own decision about whether you want a new bike or not.
This is the answer. Get on it and ride it.

Review your ride:
Was it fun? - Yes? Keep riding it.
Was it fun? - No? Why was it not fun, do you need more travel to have fun?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sure. Getting back on a bike was a blast! All I know, is what I know, and that is what a 2007 build offers. Of course I'm going to love it, like I did before. However, have things progressed in such a way that I'll be able to enjoy a ride THAT much more with a new bike? I don't know, and that's what brought me here.

I'll continue to ride my rig. I'll ride friends' bikes and slowly make an assessment. No rush. Thanks, all!
 

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Compared to your bike, current bikes have longer travel (but are shortening by the week), are heavier, steer more slowly, and are lower to the ground so you're more likely to clip a pedal on a rock. But that's okay because now you wear a full face helmet and knee pads all the time. It's more fun.

Look for the terms "down country" or "micro-enduro" to know you're shopping in the right place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Compared to your bike, current bikes have longer travel (but are shortening by the week), are heavier, steer more slowly, and are lower to the ground so you're more likely to clip a pedal on a rock. But that's okay because now you wear a full face helmet and knee pads all the time. It's more fun.

Look for the terms "down country" or "micro-enduro" to know you're shopping in the right place.
It feels good to know that I haven't been away long enough to not catch the humor in that. I've heard tidbits of these trends... so it rings true. Especially the knee pads thing. I thought my buddy was kidding. He wasn't.
 

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Sure. Getting back on a bike was a blast! All I know, is what I know, and that is what a 2007 build offers. Of course I'm going to love it, like I did before. However, have things progressed in such a way that I'll be able to enjoy a ride THAT much more with a new bike? I don't know, and that's what brought me here.

I'll continue to ride my rig. I'll ride friends' bikes and slowly make an assessment. No rush. Thanks, all!
The one thing I like the most about my new bike over my last one (2017 Intense Spider 275 vs 2006 Kona Coiler) is that it pedals better for climbs and is lighter (but that is party due to be a different segment bike) Other than that, not much better really.

Compared to your bike, current bikes have longer travel (but are shortening by the week), are heavier, steer more slowly, and are lower to the ground so you're more likely to clip a pedal on a rock. But that's okay because now you wear a full face helmet and knee pads all the time. It's more fun.

Look for the terms "down country" or "micro-enduro" to know you're shopping in the right place.
That is one thing I dislike about my current bike over my old one, the bottom bracket is sooo low I pedal strike all the time. I literally have to plan pedaling on trails where I now strike out when I would never do so before.

Because of that I will be more discerning about the Bottom Bracket location on my next bike purchase, and might move over to a 29er just to give that much more clearance.
 

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Does your bike have a dropper post? If not, that's one big change that has made a definite improvement for the better. Some people might disagree but they're wrong and dumb and unattractive and poor and...
 

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That is one thing I dislike about my current bike over my old one, the bottom bracket is sooo low I pedal strike all the time. I literally have to plan pedaling on trails where I now strike out when I would never do so before.

Because of that I will be more discerning about the Bottom Bracket location on my next bike purchase, and might move over to a 29er just to give that much more clearance.
I have a 29er but with 160mm F/161mm R travel I still bang my pedals a lot. It seems as if they're only a couple of inches off the ground at the bottom of the stroke. I nail my bash guard a lot too.
 

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There is nothing about your old bike that makes it any worse now than when it was new. Same bike. New bikes are better in many ways, but that does not make old bikes bad. Ride the bike you have now and consider what you want to ride and how. Do some casual research on bikes and then consider things. The one thing I would not do is spend lots of money on the bike you have now. Make sure it works and all, but putting lots of cash into it is probably a waste.
 

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In '06, I purchased a Giant Trance 2. Nothing is original, except the frame. I was racing and riding XTR for a while, then I switched over to SRAM X.0. It's paired with a Noir crankset, Magura Marta SL brakes, Easton carbon handlebar, seatpost, nice wheelset, Fox R in the back, Marzocchi Marathon SL (rebuilt few months ago) and I'm probably forgetting a few things. It weighs right around 26lbs or so.

This bike was the **** back in the day. It still rides really well. Sure, some parts are tired and what not, but it's been given a clean bill of health.

Here is my question: Does a present day Trance or similar XC/trail bike crap all over my old Trance?
2006 is when most of the technology was mature, but geo still mostly resembled roadie ****. There were bikes available then that are totally as fun now as a modern bike (i think yours fits this category), but they're different. Your trance is as fun as a modern bike.

Will it make you feel like a hero like its modern equivalent will? No. Is it as fast overall as its modern equivalent? No.

There's no sense in buying gucci nonsense for it, but keeping it in shape and in circulation seems cool to me. A more competent trail/enduro bike would complement it nicely. I cracked the rear triangle on my '06 canfield 2 years ago, and i miss the heck out of that bike even though it's totally dated.
 

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It feels good to know that I haven't been away long enough to not catch the humor in that. I've heard tidbits of these trends... so it rings true. Especially the knee pads thing. I thought my buddy was kidding. He wasn't.
Good advice so far. Take your time and don't pass up opportunities to demo new and different bikes.

I'm a former XC racer from the mid 90's to early 00's. I'm having a hard time getting used to wearing knee pads and usually leave them in the car but I do like the long, low, slack geometry trend. The bikes that people are calling downcountry these days make a lot of sense for serious recreational riders who mostly ride XC but are always on the lookout for steep/technical trails. Many of the bikes being marketed for Enduro racing pedal well enough that they're also a blast to ride as all around trail bikes. They're kinda heavy and you have to get used to providing a lot more steering input at slow speeds but if you have the terrain for it, they're so much fun when you can let them rip! I've been riding one since last November. I can see myself going to something lighter with a little less travel like the Ibis Ripley v4 but i'm sticking with LLS geometry.
 
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