Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've searched everywhere and I can't find out what's the difference.

I want some cheapy platforms to practice manuals and balancing stuff with... because I've already overrotated, been unable to clip out in time and landed on my ass :)

So anyway, three questions.

1. What's the difference between 1/2" and 9/16" pedals? What's that the measurement of?

2. Can I use BMX pedals on my MTB?

3. Pedal tool... what's a good one, does it even matter? Or are there any different sizes of tools...?

Good things.
 

·
Old man on a bike
Joined
·
12,395 Posts
1. 1/16" of an inch (sorry, couldn't resist). 9/16" is the standard thread diameter size (and 20 threads per inch) used for most modern bikes. Older one piece cranks used 1/2" thread diameter (also 20 threads per inch). Try this page for some further info http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/pedals.html.

2. I think maybe older BMX pedals mostly are the 1/2" type, but I'm not sure as I never had a bmx bike nor worked on one myself. You can get "flats" in the 9/16" threading fairly easily, though.

3. A pedal wrench is nice to have, but a good wrench of the correct size will do the job too. Read this http://parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=83
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had to ask, because an ebay auction I was looking at stated "works for 1/2 or 9/16"

As completely illogical and physically impossible as it sounded, I thought (there I went, thinking :) ) that it might be a measurement other than the threading.

Coooooool, thanks guys
 

·
I post too much.
Joined
·
6,445 Posts
BourneKiller said:
I've searched everywhere and I can't find out what's the difference.

I want some cheapy platforms to practice manuals and balancing stuff with... because I've already overrotated, been unable to clip out in time and landed on my ass :)

So anyway, three questions.

1. What's the difference between 1/2" and 9/16" pedals? What's that the measurement of?

2. Can I use BMX pedals on my MTB?

3. Pedal tool... what's a good one, does it even matter? Or are there any different sizes of tools...?

Good things.
1. Spindle diameter I believe

2. Yes, although you have to specify you want them in 9/16''. If you have 3-piece cranks this is a non-issue.

3. Not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,310 Posts
1: 99% of mtb cranks take 9/16" I don't see how a pedal could work with either. webcyclery has some nice odyssey platforms for $20 if price is an issue. From the box it looks like these are meant for bmx, but they work (I guess that sort of answers question 2).

3: I've been riding for 19 years (doing all my own wrenching for most of that - I know I've never asked anyone to install pedals for me) and never owned a pedal wrench. I always find it funny that whenever someone asks what tools they should start with, that's always one mentioned. I've been using a craftsman... 15mm is the size you want, by the way. A lot of pedals are going the allan wrench route though (6 or 8mm on all mine).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,671 Posts
I guess I'm in the minority so far is saying that a pedal wrench is a great tool to own. I used an adjustable crescent wrench in the past. But the pedal wrench is so much nicer to use. Kind of like V-brakes stop you fine, but disc brakes are better. Ironically, my flat pedals from ebay that said they were 9/16" take the 15mm side of the pedal wrench to install/remove. My clipless also use the 15mm end. The wrench has a 9/16" and a 15mm end. I switch pedals on the MTB often in the winter to alternate between commuter and "real MTBing" mode.
 

·
pronounced may-duh
Joined
·
4,306 Posts
The pedal wrench is thiner and longer. Thin cause some pedals don't give enough room for a regular wrench to fit. Longer for more leverage to get off the most stuborn pedals. Most people can get away with out having a real pedal wrench but every once in a while you find a pedal that has no clearance for a regular wrench. The allen key thing is not strong enough and should be discouraged.

1/2" shows up on cheap kids and department store bikes. A cheap kids BMX with one piece cranks will probably take a 1/2" pedal.
 

·
Old man on a bike
Joined
·
12,395 Posts
ewarnerusa said:
Ironically, my flat pedals from ebay that said they were 9/16" take the 15mm side of the pedal wrench to install/remove. My clipless also use the 15mm end. The wrench has a 9/16" and a 15mm end. I switch pedals on the MTB often in the winter to alternate between commuter and "real MTBing" mode.
The 15mm and 9/16" on the wrench are for the nut flats, and are a different subject than the thread size. A pedal wrench is nice in that they are often easier to use in the space alotted than a chunky adjustable wrench and have a longer lever arm length than a standard wrench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,671 Posts
Bikinfoolferlife said:
The 15mm and 9/16" on the wrench are for the nut flats, and are a different subject than the thread size. A pedal wrench is nice in that they are often easier to use in the space alotted than a chunky adjustable wrench and have a longer lever arm length than a standard wrench.
I see. I like the pedal wrench for its narrowness and because of its long handle which gets great leverage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,310 Posts
a fixed wrench is always going to be better than an adjustable. Removing pedals can take a bit of torque; not generally a strong suit of adjusters.

I've never said that a pedal wrench is useless, just that a general-purpose 15mm open can remove pedals most of the time - if you have a limited tool budged and are starting from scratch, IMO there are better places to spend the money.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top