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I just got a new 2005 Zoke Marathon XC and found the manual to be lacking, well, everything. Why did they create a virtually useless manual in 13 languages? I shutter to think how much $$ I paid for this shock and how much of that $$ went into a 400 page manual that tells me almost nothing useful. There - done whining.

Now - I like the fork, but am seeking setup advice and if anyone knows where to source details on springs, fork weight, alternate air pressure settings?
I am 175 lbs and ride XC and use the fork on a SS.

Who's running this fork and how is it setup?
Is there any useful info out there on how to maintain this fork? I also have a 2003 Fox Vanilla and it is not only simple to maintain, they actually tell you how to do it in the manual - go figure.
I'm sure folks out here know how to maintain Zokes - where's the info?

By the way, I only have 1 quick ride in, but I think I'm really gonna dig this fork, and it might just pass my Fox for performance.
 

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I just picked up a 05' Marathon SL, had it mounted and was trying to get my air pressures dialed in. It came with this cruddy little pump adapter made out of aluminum, that snaped off in the recepticale, luckily I was able to remove the broken nipple; but it totally deflated my Positive TST pressure. I have no idea where I am going to be able to get a replacement adapter so that I can get this fork rideable.

I havn't had a chance to ride the bike yet.

As far as the manual goes, I found it fairly specific in terms of pressure setups namely table 6.3.
 

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Your LBS can order the adaptor through 'QBP' (Quality Bicycle Products).

squeejee said:
I just picked up a 05' Marathon SL, had it mounted and was trying to get my air pressures dialed in. It came with this cruddy little pump adapter made out of aluminum, that snaped off in the recepticale, luckily I was able to remove the broken nipple; but it totally deflated my Positive TST pressure. I have no idea where I am going to be able to get a replacement adapter so that I can get this fork rideable.

I havn't had a chance to ride the bike yet.

As far as the manual goes, I found it fairly specific in terms of pressure setups namely table 6.3.
 

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Great Tech BikerX. Thanks, I was also able to find a LBS that has one adapter in stock. I will be running there right after work so that I can get on the trails this weekend.

I am going to probably order a couple backups from QBP as that piece broke way too easy, luckily there is one in town, I would hate to have to wait a couple weeks for a piece like that to arrive especially when the weather is nice.
 

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I'd love to make a tuning site dedicated to the '05 Zokie XC! Throw me the clams for one, and I'll go to town on it:p

Jesterrider said:
Now you need to by a 2005 Marathon XC and post the same for it :)
Nice job - nice site!
 

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Servicing or setting up info needed?

...I found the manual ok, you can also check the homapage for more info.
1. Adjust TAS
2. Find correct air pressure in right leg by measuring sag
3. Find the right rebound damping for weight and terrain (right leg bottom)
4. Experiment with TST (right leg top)

IMHO this is the best 120 mm fork once set up perfectly.

-b
 

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Code Burr
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oil weight

What weight oil are you heavier cats using?
I just talked to marzocchi tech support and they suggested 10 weight oil.
I go about 225 decked out so I might need it.
While were on the subject, has anyone used Bel Ray oil?
My local shop doenst carry golden spectro.
 

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thebronze said:
What weight oil are you heavier cats using?
I just talked to marzocchi tech support and they suggested 10 weight oil.
I go about 225 decked out so I might need it.
While were on the subject, has anyone used Bel Ray oil?
My local shop doenst carry golden spectro.
I've been using Bel Ray since last year on my Marathon S since I couldn't find Golden Spectro. It's working OK to me. I just mixed 5wt and 10wt to attain the reccomended 7.5wt as I learned here at the forum.
Cheers.
 

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Hello, I have a Marzocchi Marathon XC and I want to adjust the TAS. How do I make sure it's correct?
With no air in the TST cartridge, setting on the bike it drops about 35mm. I weigh 185lbs, so I put about 3 psi into the TST and my TAS is set at about 1 click (more makes the fork too stiff).
I though when you turn the TAS in it was suppose to allow for more travel, but I am finding it makes the fork much stiffer at the same pressure. Any suggestions?

Thanks
 

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"El Whatever"
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Hello, I have a Marzocchi Marathon XC and I want to adjust the TAS. How do I make sure it's correct?
With no air in the TST cartridge, setting on the bike it drops about 35mm. I weigh 185lbs, so I put about 3 psi into the TST and my TAS is set at about 1 click (more makes the fork too stiff).
I though when you turn the TAS in it was suppose to allow for more travel, but I am finding it makes the fork much stiffer at the same pressure. Any suggestions?

Thanks
TAS effectively shortens the fork length. So, it reduces the air chamber size on the TST side when you shorten the travel.

I think you are shortening up the travel. I can't remember from memory, but I think it's a right thread there and turning the adjuster clockwise shortens the fork.

Also, take time to play with the oil levels in the ETA/TAS side. Too much and it makes the fork very progressive, too little and it may brake dive some.

Also, those forks turn out to be very sensitive to pressure in the TST side and also to oil level there. When the fork compresses, the bladder in the damper swells, reducing even further air volume.

Try reducing the pressure a little. On my AM1 I used to run 20 to 25 pump strokes. The dial wouldn't even register a thing.

Or... you can drop the spring on the ETA. I also recall that there was/is an ETA cap that has preload adjustment that makes tuning even more effective, etc.

Marzocchis of old were very adjustable.
 

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TAS effectively shortens the fork length. So, it reduces the air chamber size on the TST side when you shorten the travel.

I think you are shortening up the travel. I can't remember from memory, but I think it's a right thread there and turning the adjuster clockwise shortens the fork.

Also, take time to play with the oil levels in the ETA/TAS side. Too much and it makes the fork very progressive, too little and it may brake dive some.

Also, those forks turn out to be very sensitive to pressure in the TST side and also to oil level there. When the fork compresses, the bladder in the damper swells, reducing even further air volume.

Try reducing the pressure a little. On my AM1 I used to run 20 to 25 pump strokes. The dial wouldn't even register a thing.

Or... you can drop the spring on the ETA. I also recall that there was/is an ETA cap that has preload adjustment that makes tuning even more effective, etc.

Marzocchis of old were very adjustable.
Hello, and thank you for the advice. Question, according to the service manual turning the TAS knob clockwise reduces the max travel. and conversely for counter-clockwise.
Would you suggest I turn the know clockwise until it stops, or should I back it all the way out and turn it back in until I get the desired length of travel?

thank you for your help
 

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"El Whatever"
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Hello, and thank you for the advice. Question, according to the service manual turning the TAS knob clockwise reduces the max travel. and conversely for counter-clockwise.
Would you suggest I turn the know clockwise until it stops, or should I back it all the way out and turn it back in until I get the desired length of travel?

thank you for your help
No worries. I can't remember exactly where to turn it.

I now recall though, Zoke recommended to release all the pressure off the fork before turning the TAS. I used to only compress the fork as the spring force that keeps the fork extended, also makes the TAS hard to turn.

You can turn it clockwise until it stops. But you should take the knobs to the extremes to understand better how the fork works. It won't damage a thing. The difference between max and min travel is 20mm.

Just make notes of how many clicks or turns you give, so you can easily go back to the settings you know that work for you.
 

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No worries. I can't remember exactly where to turn it.

I now recall though, Zoke recommended to release all the pressure off the fork before turning the TAS. I used to only compress the fork as the spring force that keeps the fork extended, also makes the TAS hard to turn.

You can turn it clockwise until it stops. But you should take the knobs to the extremes to understand better how the fork works. It won't damage a thing. The difference between max and min travel is 20mm.

Just make notes of how many clicks or turns you give, so you can easily go back to the settings you know that work for you.
Your comments have been very helpful, thank you!
I probably gained the 20mm because I think the LBS had originially set up the
fork to run at the minimum length? So, now I have full travel minus a click or two. What problems should I watch for if the length is too long? The SAG seems just right now. Also, I don't see a great deal of rebound damping. I read somewhere that having either the TAS or Rebound damping at an extreme end will affect the other? Should I be dialing in the length, or does the air pressure play a bigger role?

thanks
 

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"El Whatever"
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Your comments have been very helpful, thank you!
I probably gained the 20mm because I think the LBS had originially set up the
fork to run at the minimum length? So, now I have full travel minus a click or two. What problems should I watch for if the length is too long? The SAG seems just right now. Also, I don't see a great deal of rebound damping. I read somewhere that having either the TAS or Rebound damping at an extreme end will affect the other? Should I be dialing in the length, or does the air pressure play a bigger role?

thanks
You should have no problems running it at full length, short travel, in the middle. The system is mechanical, a simple threaded rod moving in and out of another. Dead simple.

You should set air pressure and sag for the setting you will use the most (and compromise in the other).

Feeling no rebound is not normal. Have you tried to dial all the rebound possible?
Try also locking the fork. The lock out should allow a max of 10mm of travel before locking. And Marzocchi meant DEAD lock. It's very difficult to blow through the lock out.

As for how much length, that's up to your terrain and personal preference. If you ride steep downhills, use the longest travel. If you ride steep climbs, use the shorter one.

Air pressure plays a big role but don't over do it. Put as necessary pressure to have 25% sag at the travel setting desired. If you can bottom the fork too easily or dives a lot, add a little more pressure or a click or two only on the TST.

If you are not using the full travel of the fork, put a little less air pressure.
 
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