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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All

I'm having a fork choice shocker. I currently run a '05 Z1Fr1 on my Transition Preston, and although I'm generally ahppy with the fork I can't help thinking I'm missing out. I've heard from various people on herre that the 05 Sherman Flick is a bit stiffer laterally than the Z1 and also a bit plusher over small obstacles while still resisting bottoming. I weigh arount 170lb ready to roll if that is relevant.

Has any one had both these forks and have an opinion?

Likewise, if you're a Sherman Flick owner please let me know your thoughts.

Cost is not important as I can get the Sherman for a very good price and if I like it sell the Z1 and not lose out.
 

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jonk said:
Hey All

I'm having a fork choice shocker. I currently run a '05 Z1Fr1 on my Transition Preston, and although I'm generally ahppy with the fork I can't help thinking I'm missing out. I've heard from various people on herre that the 05 Sherman Flick is a bit stiffer laterally than the Z1 and also a bit plusher over small obstacles while still resisting bottoming. I weigh arount 170lb ready to roll if that is relevant.

Has any one had both these forks and have an opinion?

Likewise, if you're a Sherman Flick owner please let me know your thoughts.

Cost is not important as I can get the Sherman for a very good price and if I like it sell the Z1 and not lose out.
I moved from a z1 ('04) to an '05 Flick. If you go this route, let me warn you that you will prob need to buy heavier springs than stock. That said, I am much happier with the fork. My problem w/ the Z1 was that it typically rode low in it's travel and dove excessively under braking. It basically does not have much compression damping, while I am increasingly finding that I like my suspension to be well damped.

The Sherman is unquestionably easier to bottom than a Z1 with the proper oil height. It does not bottom violently, however, and newer Manitous are constructed in a way that makes bottoming them not really a problem. (you SHOULD bottom your suspension on really big hits, like large drops to flat. Generally once every few rides if you're properly set up. Many people on this forum seem to forget this.)

From a quality standpoint, the Sherman kills the Marzocchi hands down. The bushings are harder and feel like they have tighter tolerances. This means more break-in time, but better performance throughout the life of the fork. Also, not having too many metal-on-metal contacts, Manitous don't produce the metallic sludge in their oil that Marzocchis have after a few months of riding. This is also due to the fact that Marzocchi does not hard anodize their internals the way Fox does, for example.

From a maintainence standpoint, I can tune a Manitou's shim stack for the performance I desire, whereas Marzocchi's press-fit on their pumping rod makes them essentially untuneable by traditional methods like stiffer shims. Also, when I call Manitou, I get someone who is ready to advise me on technical matters and speaks with a high level of sophistication about suspension technology. When I call Marzocchi, I get some kid who knows less about suspension than I do, and they won't kick down small parts.

If it sounds like I'm bagging on the Marzocchi, I am. I work at a bike shop, and dealing them and their products usually leaves me feeling ticked off. HOWEVER, I am a snobby bike shop employee, comfortable with disassembling and tuning/servicing suspension. Marzocchis are excellent if you just want to throw a fork on your bike and not deal with it. Their performance is not exactly excellent, but it is consistent, even when abused and not maintained regularly. Also, my negative comments about Marzocchis do not extend to the 888 and 66 family. They might as well be made by a different company considering how much better they are than every other fork Marzocchi makes. They're a little heavy, but they perform.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks!

Kracker said:
I moved from a z1 ('04) to an '05 Flick. If you go this route, let me warn you that you will prob need to buy heavier springs than stock. That said, I am much happier with the fork. My problem w/ the Z1 was that it typically rode low in it's travel and dove excessively under braking. It basically does not have much compression damping, while I am increasingly finding that I like my suspension to be well damped.

The Sherman is unquestionably easier to bottom than a Z1 with the proper oil height. It does not bottom violently, however, and newer Manitous are constructed in a way that makes bottoming them not really a problem. (you SHOULD bottom your suspension on really big hits, like large drops to flat. Generally once every few rides if you're properly set up. Many people on this forum seem to forget this.)

From a quality standpoint, the Sherman kills the Marzocchi hands down. The bushings are harder and feel like they have tighter tolerances. This means more break-in time, but better performance throughout the life of the fork. Also, not having too many metal-on-metal contacts, Manitous don't produce the metallic sludge in their oil that Marzocchis have after a few months of riding. This is also due to the fact that Marzocchi does not hard anodize their internals the way Fox does, for example.

From a maintainence standpoint, I can tune a Manitou's shim stack for the performance I desire, whereas Marzocchi's press-fit on their pumping rod makes them essentially untuneable by traditional methods like stiffer shims. Also, when I call Manitou, I get someone who is ready to advise me on technical matters and speaks with a high level of sophistication about suspension technology. When I call Marzocchi, I get some kid who knows less about suspension than I do, and they won't kick down small parts.

If it sounds like I'm bagging on the Marzocchi, I am. I work at a bike shop, and dealing them and their products usually leaves me feeling ticked off. HOWEVER, I am a snobby bike shop employee, comfortable with disassembling and tuning/servicing suspension. Marzocchis are excellent if you just want to throw a fork on your bike and not deal with it. Their performance is not exactly excellent, but it is consistent, even when abused and not maintained regularly. Also, my negative comments about Marzocchis do not extend to the 888 and 66 family. They might as well be made by a different company considering how much better they are than every other fork Marzocchi makes. They're a little heavy, but they perform.
Kracker,

Thanks for the reply. That is a nice in depth view which is what I was looking for. I've managed to get them feeling a little plusher by removing one of the springs and adding more air in the right leg, but as you say they do tend to dive quite a lot. I've decided to keep them for now thugh, and see what offerins both Marzocchi and manitou have for next year. Thanks again.
 

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Still on Training Wheels!
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Haqve you thought about the RS PIKE? All of its adjustments can be done on the fly and have very wide tuneability. Plus the fork is super stiff. I've been riding mine a couple days now and have been very impressed!
 

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carpe mañana
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Kracker said:
Also, not having too many metal-on-metal contacts, Manitous don't produce the metallic sludge in their oil that Marzocchis have after a few months of riding. This is also due to the fact that Marzocchi does not hard anodize their internals the way Fox does, for example.
Isn't this true only of the Fox floats?

_MK
 
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