Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As others ahve experienced I have also had a recent problem with my XLT top seatstay pivot bearing. I wanted to try to get an idea how wide this problem this is... cany you please respond if you have had an issue with:

1. Model XLT '05 XLT (black) frameset only from JensonUSA.com
2. Pivot location of problem Top of seatstay pivot (both sides)
3. How many miles you had on the bike before the bearing broke ~50
4. Sevice experience w/ Jamis as a result I haven't called yet... (gonna try Enduro Kit)

I included my answers above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Bump!!

I know for a fact others have ahd bearing problems... post up... I am trying to get an idea if the beaing issues are only on the XLT 0's, Just the XLT frames from JensonUSA, or all '05 XLTs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
mp29k said:
As others ahve experienced I have also had a recent problem with my XLT top seatstay pivot bearing. I wanted to try to get an idea how wide this problem this is... cany you please respond if you have had an issue with:

1. Model XLT '05 XLT (black) frameset only from JensonUSA.com
2. Pivot location of problem Top of seatstay pivot (both sides)
3. How many miles you had on the bike before the bearing broke ~50
4. Sevice experience w/ Jamis as a result I haven't called yet... (gonna try Enduro Kit)

I included my answers above.
1) Black '05 XLT from Jenson.
2) Shock Collar (where rear tri joins at the shock) bearings are the worse. Other bearings appear to be going too.
3) 25-30 rides/ 300+ miles
4) No experience with Jamis.

I've ridden this bike hard since I got it. Drops, urban, lots of trails etc. Aside from the bearings wearing out, the thing that bothers me worse is the lateral flex that is now occurring. I feel the rear end tracking all over the place when I ride now. If I hold the seat with one hand, and push the rear tire laterally with my other hand, I notice a TON of flex. I can almost push the side of the tire into the chain stays. The bearings creak at the same time and I can actually see the rear triangle flex at the points where the bearings are. I didn't try the flex test before I started riding it so I'm not sure if a new bearing kit will do the trick.

I'm not banging the bike though, I love pretty much all characteristics of the bike, it climbs and descends well, I just don't feel that it is appropriate for repetitive light freeride, plus I weight around 190-195 with gear. I'm looking at getting a Transition Preston now and either keeping the XLT and building a light XC setup or selling it.
 

·
Paste eater
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
I must be closing in on 100o miles on my Jenson XLT and all is well. It my trail bike nothing more than a few drops here and there. However, the spring/summer here in Maine has been REALLY wet and the bike has really taken a bating as far as weather goes. lots of mud and grit -- it was completely submerged once (oops). I had to clean out my headset once, which is shitty (any one know of a high end headset that fits a XLT -- sealed bearings a must)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I talked to Jamis last night

They said that the bearing cage is made from hard rubber in some if the pivot points. I am assuming that this is causing some rear flex, and eventually bearing failure. THey also said that the bearings are occasionaly damanged by the hydraulic press that inserts them at the factory... I guess this could be why some of us have had problems and others no issues.

I am pursuing a warranty claim thru Jenson, and will keep you all updated on the progress... I personally feel that if the bike failed after < 100 miles as mine did, that I should not have to pay to have a ship install the bearings either. Tht is going to be hard considering Jenson is in CA, and I am in DE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
1. Model XLT '05 XLT (black) frameset only from JensonUSA.com
2. Pivot location of problem Top of seatstay pivot (both sides)
3. How many miles you had on the bike before the bearing broke Never actually broke, but it started to break no mroe than 20 miles in
4. Sevice experience w/ Jamis as a result Jenson resent new bearings without a problem. Jamis refused to deal with me, and jsut told me to talk to a dealer.

My bearing went to the extent that all the balls fell out, so that the outer ring stayed inside the seatstay. With no way to remove that outer ring, I was forced to get a new (warantee) seatstay.

I have since ordered and installed new enduro bearings from jenson.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
mine looked exactly the same...

did they just send you a new seatstay without the bearings installed? That would be ideal. Jamis gave me some lip service about how their bearings were tested and were very good. How do the enduro bearings work?? How hard did you try to get the bearing out? Did they just have you deal w/ a local shop? Sorry about all the questions but I looked @ your picture and thought someone had broken into my house and taken a photo... exact same looking failure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Removing Seatstay Bearings

I had my bearing come completely apart on my 05 XLT about a month ago. The outer cage was definately hard to remove. I took a die grinder and ground the cage down until I could hit it with a punch and break it in half. Then I warmed the seat stay in the oven and froze the bearings so they almost dropped in. A good tip for everyone...the seatstay bearings are the same size as skateboard wheel bearings. Even good bearings from the skateboard shop were only $10 for eight of them. Bike shops and the local bearing place wanted that much each. The new bearings have been in for a couple hundred miles and lots of drops with no problem. I am going to start replacing them every six months, so I don't have to fight the seperated bearing cage problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,061 Posts
Bearing FYI...

pwester said:
I had my bearing come completely apart on my 05 XLT about a month ago. The outer cage was definately hard to remove. I took a die grinder and ground the cage down until I could hit it with a punch and break it in half. Then I warmed the seat stay in the oven and froze the bearings so they almost dropped in. A good tip for everyone...the seatstay bearings are the same size as skateboard wheel bearings. Even good bearings from the skateboard shop were only $10 for eight of them. Bike shops and the local bearing place wanted that much each. The new bearings have been in for a couple hundred miles and lots of drops with no problem. I am going to start replacing them every six months, so I don't have to fight the seperated bearing cage problem.
It appears to me that Enduro Fork Seals sells a suspension bearing kit for the XLT. I don't own a Jamis, but I purchased a bearing kit for my Iron Horse Hollowpoint and was very satisfied.

With regard to bearing removal, you might try pressing the bearing out using a pair of suitably sized sockets. One socket will be used for pressing the bearing out, the other will serve as a receptacle for "catching" the bearing as it's pressed out. The "presser" socket should be as large as possible and yet still fit into the hole holding the bearing. (Usually you'll press the bearing out from the inside - there's usually a small lip which prevents the bearing from moving laterally once pressed in and tightened. That said, I have no idea what the situation is with the XLT. Study it carefully before proceeding.) The idea here is to press (as much as possible) on the outer edge of the race and not on the bearing seals. If you press on the bearing seals, chances are good that you'll destroy the bearing if it's in really tight. (If that happens, you may have to resort to a grinder and punch as described by pwester.) The receptacle socket goes on the other side and you use a suitably sized bolt (w/ washers and nut) to connect the two. Tightening the nut on the bolt will (hopefully) cause the bearing to be pressed out.

Inserting the bearing can be done in a similar manner, though it's no longer necessary to have a "receptacle socket". A suitably large washer may be used in it's place. Also, since you no longer have the lip to contend with, a slightly larger socket (than was used for removal) can most likely be used to press the bearing in. Again, using the largest socket that still fits in the bearing hole is advisable to avoid putting pressure on the bearing seals, and underneath, the balls. Take care to get the bearing started evenly. Once you get it started, the going gets easier.

Hope this is of help to someone...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I think I ****ed up...

I couldn't use the socket method because of extra material on the seatstay prevents it from sitting flush... I got one of them out but the other one though would not budge, I can't tell but I may bent the "lip" in the proscess of trying to remove it. Next step either grind it out, and rework the "lip" back into place (if it is bent), or just buy/warranty a new seatstay... Hopefully not the latter, I have enough into this build already to have to shell out big bucks after only 3 rides...:madman: :madmax: :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,061 Posts
mp29k said:
I couldn't use the socket method because of extra material on the seatstay prevents it from sitting flush...
I had an almost identical problem on my Hollowpoint. The swingarm was curved near one of the pivots and this curvature prevented the "receptacle socket" from laying flat. As a consequence, the socket would either slide off the swingarm and/or the bearing would start to get pressed out unevenly.

I was able to get one of the bearings out by constructing a suitable platform out of a stack of cut-down washers that I had taped together. I basically cut the washers in half. If I had to do it over again, I'd cut out only the segments that interfered with the curvature of the swingarm, removing smaller segments from washers higher in the stack.

I had difficulty keeping this makeshift platform in place and was only able to remove one of the bearings intact. The other bearing I destroyed in the process. At one point, I tried using just a washer to press the bearing out. It didn't make contact with the outer edge of the bearing and put a lot of pressure on the inner part of the mechanism. What I was left with at that point was just the race left in the hole. Fortunately, at that point, I was able to use the socket trick in conjunction with my makeshift platform to remove it. I was lucky that the socket still made conctact with the bit of race still remaining. Perhaps my earlier efforts had loosened it. Or, perhaps, the removal of the inner part of the bearing allowed the race to flex enough to allow it to be removed. Had that not worked, I would've resorted to using a punch, but was avoiding impact methods for as long as possible.

Another approach for constructing a suitable platform to press against is to take a short length of pipe and cut / grind part of it away to match the curvature of the swingarm. Someone in the Iron Horse forum said that this is what they did to remove their bearings. They also indicated that it was a long and tedious process. I have the distinct impression that some sort of metal pipe was used, but it occurs to me that it might be worth trying it with PVC pipe first since it'll be easier to grind and shape. I don't know if the PVC pipe will be strong enough though.

Good luck to you in getting your bearing out...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks,

KevinB said:
Good luck to you in getting your bearing out...
Thanks... I am sufficiently frustrated with the whole thing right now. I really don't want to keep a frame that is going to give me frequent and persistent bearing issues, but it was all I could really afford. I think I am going to finish buildig up my SS and ride that for a while... the simplicity of a rigid HT SS is very enticing after last nights debacle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
mp29k said:
did they just send you a new seatstay without the bearings installed? That would be ideal. Jamis gave me some lip service about how their bearings were tested and were very good. How do the enduro bearings work?? How hard did you try to get the bearing out? Did they just have you deal w/ a local shop? Sorry about all the questions but I looked @ your picture and thought someone had broken into my house and taken a photo... exact same looking failure.
The warranty seatstay was supplied WITH bearings, but they are easy to remove.

The stock bearings ARE crap, but I can hardly be suprised or disapointed becasue of the price of the frame.

The enduro bearings have been installed, and i am hoping to test them Thursday. They have ALL(or mostly) balls inside them instead of just 4-5 balls and a big rubber carrier- better for high-load, low rotation uses.

The bearings are really easy to take out if you use the right method- blunt force is far less effective than slow, even force. I used a tool made of a long threaded rod and a few bolts and washers- things that can be found at any hardware store.

All these bearings are available at Jenson individually, by the way.

New seatstay bearing

New chainstay bearing

Old chainstay bearing removed, with seal removed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
mikedb said:
The bearings are really easy to take out if you use the right method- blunt force is far less effective than slow, even force. I used a tool made of a long threaded rod and a few bolts and washers- things that can be found at any hardware store.
do you mind taking a picture of the "tool" you used and a brief description of its use? I am going to try to get a new seatstay too. If Jamis won't warranty it I will try to use your method.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
mp29k said:
do you mind taking a picture of the "tool" you used and a brief description of its use? I am going to try to get a new seatstay too. If Jamis won't warranty it I will try to use your method.
Sure. In reading back, I am not exactly sure what situation you are in- this method will only work with intact bearings. Just wrench each nut in opposite directions and the bearing will get pushed out. Do the opposite to put new bearing in.



Now, what is also interesting, is that the warranty bearings I recieved are, in fact, different bearings, with a metal cage instead of a rubber one. This means that the bearing will not fall apart and nescessitate a new seatstay.

METAL--------------------------------------------------RUBBER



Finally, for the record, the names of the bearings are:

Seatstay: 608
Chainstay: 6903

Both are available in the MAX variety, and both are available at JensonUSA.com for roughly $5-8. Remember MAX bearings are 50% to TWICE as strong as conventional bearings, and far, far stronger than the OEM bearings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Thanks dude, you rock.

mikedb said:
that picture makes perfect sense... can't believe I didn't think of it. Thanks.
 

·
Singletrack Addict!!!
Joined
·
913 Posts
Sorry to hijack, but by looking at the pics here, I see the 05-06 bearings are bigger than the earlier models ( at least 04). Below 04 frame


As you can see there's more space around the bearing and the screw head completely covers the bearing, maybe screw head is a bit bigger also, thou I doubt it.

Below 05 frame.



Anyone has had any problems with the 04 bearings? So far mine are good. By the way great thread! Thanks all for the pics and ideas..:rockon:

Thanks mp29k... All knowing Tommy Boy out...;)
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top