Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Nuts. My lightly used but probably-out-of-warranty '03 Talas has oil all over the right leg after today's ride, from the adjuster knobs on down. The manual doesn't have a trouble-shooting section. Any ideas as to what is likely to have failed? Is this a potential do-it-yourself repair, or should I just box it up today and get ready to send it back to Fox on Monday? I haven't pulled it apart yet, but if it's a DIY, what should I look for? I never got around to changing the spring in the Skareb on my Titus last weekend, so I'm going to take care of that first so I've got something to ride. Off to the garage.....

Kathy :^/
 

·
Do It Yourself
Joined
·
5,720 Posts
That's doesn't sound good...

If it's leaking from around the outside of the top cap, you might just need to adjust/replace the top cap seal. However, if it's leaking from around the rebound adjustment rod (underneath the adjustment knob), you will probably want to send it in. Here was my story...

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=13365

See if Fox will fix for free. If they want you to pay, you might want to wait and send it to Push Industries instead. They will have their Fox fork upgrades ready soon.
 

·
Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Homebrew said:
If it's leaking from around the outside of the top cap, you might just need to adjust/replace the top cap seal. However, if it's leaking from around the rebound adjustment rod (underneath the adjustment knob), you will probably want to send it in. Here was my story...

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=13365
Uh, yikes! That's a lot of itty bitty parts. Good for you for having the nads to delve into it. I'll check the top cap to see if it's loose or leaking. I spent yesterday afternoon changing the spring it the Skareb and getting that bike ready to ride, so I didn't have time to play with it.

Homebrew said:
See if Fox will fix for free. If they want you to pay, you might want to wait and send it to Push Industries instead. They will have their Fox fork upgrades ready soon.
I've heard of Push Industries, but don't really know what mods they make. What would they do to my fork?

Kathy :^)
 

·
Do It Yourself
Joined
·
5,720 Posts
Lucky said:
Uh, yikes! That's a lot of itty bitty parts.
Yeah, and mine was the simpler R version. The RLC has adds even more bits and pieces.

Lucky said:
Good for you for having the nads to delve into it.
I bought the fork used so no warranty. It was completely forked so I figured it could only get better. I really didn't have anything to loose.

Lucky said:
I've heard of Push Industries, but don't really know what mods they make. What would they do to my fork?
Not quite available yet but very soon. Push does a complete custom tuning of the fork and adding a stable platform, all setup for your weight and riding preferences. They will take the compression damping adjust and make it a platform adjustment, use the lockout lever to turn the platform on and off, and replace the simple damping piston with a two-stage damping with separate high and low speed. High speed is preset by Push and the slow speed is set with the red rebound knob. I'm looking forward to trying it myself.

If you have a Fox rear shock, mods are available now for that. They completely gut them, add all new custom parts, and setup just for you. All for not much more than a standard rebuild from Fox and much less than a new shock.

Good luck.
 

·
Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Homebrew said:
I bought the fork used so no warranty. It was completely forked so I figured it could only get better. I really didn't have anything to loose..
I spoke to Fox, and let them know that from a time standpoint, mine's out of warranty, but that it really has 6 months use or less by a lightweight wimpy girl who doesn't let both tires get off the ground at the same time. They weren't sympathetic and are going to stick by the purchase date, even though it's clear to me this is a manufacturing defect. There's no way on God's green earth I've done anything to damage or wear out the fork. I haven't ridden it long or hard enough. Heck, it's barely broken in! I'm going to remember this next time I'm in the market for a shock product. My much-maligned '00 RS SID has held up much better through much more abuse. Yeah, I'm not a happy camper right now, and I'm inclined to put this in the reviews.

Homebrew said:
Not quite available yet but very soon. Push does a complete custom tuning of the fork and adding a stable platform, all setup for your weight and riding preferences. They will take the compression damping adjust and make it a platform adjustment, use the lockout lever to turn the platform on and off, and replace the simple damping piston with a two-stage damping with separate high and low speed. High speed is preset by Push and the slow speed is set with the red rebound knob. I'm looking forward to trying it myself.

If you have a Fox rear shock, mods are available now for that. They completely gut them, add all new custom parts, and setup just for you. All for not much more than a standard rebuild from Fox and much less than a new shock.

Good luck.
Hmmm. I'm not sure I really want SPV. I really like small-bump sensitivity, which I've heard can be reduced with SPV. At my weight, that's already a bit compromised with the Talas. I'm not a stand-up climber, and I don't race this rig, so a bobbing fork isn't an issue. Is the Push version of SPV better for small-bump sensitivity?

As for the rear shock, the DW link on the Hollowpoint really doesn't seem to need SPV. I've been really happy with performance on that end of the bike, so I'm inclined to leave it alone. If it ain't broke...

I haven't decided whether or not to try to fix the Talas myself. Fox quoted $60-$100 for repairs, plus I'll have to pay to ship it. If it were a well-used fork, I'd have no problem, but it galls me to have to pay that kind of money to fix their mistake. They're going to send me a free damper shaft o-ring, which was the least they could do. If I open it up myself, I'll probably put 2.5wt oil in, which other lightweights are saying helps with the responsiveness. I'm going to go print your post and photos and think about my options for a while. Thanks for all the info.

Kathy
 

·
Do It Yourself
Joined
·
5,720 Posts
I know what you mean. It's not really up to the technicians though. The guy I spoke to at Fox said they get audited to make sure they are only performing warranty work within the warranty period and only with a receipt. Can't really fault them for following policy but it still sucks.

I'm not a big platform fanatic either. I consider it more of a bonus and a much better system than a lockout. For me, the best part of the Push mods is the two-stage damping. The two-stage piston allows you to use more slow speed damping so you don't get bounced off the bigger hits but still maintaining good high speed damping so the shock doesn't pack up on the smaller successive bumps. With the stock Fox, the rebound dial sets both so you have to compromise one or the other (or both to some degree). It sounds like you could benefit from the full custom tuning as well. I'm within the "normal" range so it's that big a deal for me but many others can benefit.

My shock was 2 years old and overdue for maintenance anyway when I sent mine in to Push. It wasn't much more that what Fox charges for an overhaul, much cheaper than a new shock and much improved performance to boot. For me, it was a no-brainer. Although not everyone's situation is as clear cut as mine, I would be hesitant to give Fox more hard earned money just get get back the same performance when for a little more I could get a full custom tuned shock or fork.

If you happen to delve into your fork guts, besure to take lots of pictures. Not just for the benefit of others but so you know how to put it all back together. :p Anyway, good luck in getting your fork issue resolved.
 

·
Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Whew boy. Read through your instructions thoroughly. I understand clearly the first 6 pics. I think I have that same vise. ;^P I'm not crystal clear on what happened between #6 and #7, the last one, though. Was the thinner rod inside the fatter one, and is the photo of the upper or lower end? When you say the "bottom screw", I'm not clear on what that is either. I suspect I may not have to go that far and that possibly one of the o-rings that are visible in you photos is going to be my problem. (I hope it's that simple!) When I pull the damper, is all the oil going to be inside the reservoir, aside from what comes out when you undo the bottom screw, i.e. should that spring be all oily, or should that part be relatively dry?

I cleaned off the fork and cycled it a bunch of times. It looks like oil is definitely weeping from under the adjuster knobs on big hits. The seal at the lowers looks okay other than a very faint oil ring on the stanchion which the manual says is normal.

I e-mailed the folks at Push Ind. for more info, so maybe this will all be mute, depending on what they have to say.

Kathy
 

·
Do It Yourself
Joined
·
5,720 Posts
#7 is where I removed the screw and pulled the adjustment rod out. The silver tube is the same as the whole piece in #4 (look at the right side). The darker rod above that is the rebound adjustment rod that is the piece to which the red rebound knob is attached. You can see the tip of the rod sticking out of the top cap in #6. #7 shows the other end. This rod goes in through the top cap and down the silver tube and is held in with a screw at the bottom (right side of the pic). There is a seal on the rod at the top cap to keep the oil in. To check this, I would not take the fork apart just yet. Put it all back together except the top cap. Clean the oil off, go ride it a bit or just cycle it to fully diagnose where the oil is coming from. If you are indeed leaking out from around this adjustment rod, you'll need to disassemble like I did and replace the seal.

As far as where the oil is, there is some that is loose in the legs and some that inside the canister. You probably want to drain it by carefully pushing up the shim at the bottom of the resevoir with a small allen wrench.

Anyway, I hope that helps explain the situation better. Let me know if you have any other questions.
 

·
Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
HomebrewTo check this said:
Okay, now I understand all the pics.

Good idea. I haven't done anything other than clean it and cycle it a bit so far. I just discovered that the 26mm socket is in my ex's toolbox and not mine, so I need to visit Home Depot or Sears. And wait for the o-ring from Fox, anyway. I can pull all the top knobs and see where the oil is oozing from. It's probably the adjuster rod o-ring. If the spring chamber is not full of oil, I suspect there wouldn't be enough pressure to force oil out past the top cap o-ring so easily. Will check this. The more I look at your instructions, the less intimidating this looks. Tricky yes, scary, no.

On reassembly, would I just add oil as per the oil change instructions? Or do I need to put some in the cylinder and some elsewhere? Unless Push is going to have their mod available soon, I'm inclined to give it a go myself. I already bought 2.5wt oil a while ago intending to try it once the warrantee expired. I guess I'm there.

Thanks for the tutorial and all your patience with my 20 million questions.

Kathy :^)
 

·
Not dead yet, just playin
Joined
·
910 Posts
I'm not Homebrew..

Lucky said:
On reassembly, would I just add oil as per the oil change instructions? Or do I need to put some in the cylinder and some elsewhere?
But I can answer this one. Yes, follow the oil change intructions when putting it back together. Most recommend slightly less oil (5cc less) in the damper leg than instructed. You just need to make sure you don't use too much oil or you'll cause the fork to not compress fully.

I'm not sure of the "user-servicibilty" of the spring side. Last I heard, the talas side was off-limits to tinkering..
 

·
Do It Yourself
Joined
·
5,720 Posts
ohpossum said:
But I can answer this one. Yes, follow the oil change intructions when putting it back together. Most recommend slightly less oil (5cc less) in the damper leg than instructed. You just need to make sure you don't use too much oil or you'll cause the fork to not compress fully.

I'm not sure of the "user-servicibilty" of the spring side. Last I heard, the talas side was off-limits to tinkering..
Since you are fully disassembling the damping unit, it will be pretty much bone dry when reassembling. As long as you fully drain the legs and wring out the foam rings, I think you would be safe to put the full 155-160cc on the damping side. You can just add the oil through the top cap or into the bottom of the legs and the oil will get to where it needs to go.
 

·
Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
ohpossum said:
Last I heard, the talas side was off-limits to tinkering..
Believe me, I have no intention of tinkering with the Talas side! I just need to fix a leak in the damper side. I wish I didn't even have to do that.

Kathy :^)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top