Ritchey Logic Older Pedals

DESCRIPTION

Ritchey Pedals Logic

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-10 of 242  
[Jan 10, 2011]
valiant1974
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Strength:

They're clipless

Weakness:

Where should I begin? Difficult to get into. Too easy to get out of. I've had issues with disengagement when trying to jump or go over logs. I had an adjustment screw fall out during a ride never to be found again. The cleats are terrible.

Avoid these pedals at all cost.

Similar Products Used:

Time ATAC

[Mar 14, 2002]
rob
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Reasonably light (compared to 858)
Cheapish/value

Weakness:

Requires service of bearing every 3-6 months depending on use. Soft alloy axle nut, can be easily rounded by a 6mm hex key. Then you are stuffed for a while.

After I rounded the nut trying to service the bearing, I had to get a hacksaw to cut a grove in hte nut and then (very slowly) use a big fat flat screwdriver to remove it. The Aussie distributers of ritchey are great (Dirtworks), and got a replacement withing a week.

Similar Products Used:

Wellgo, Time

[Feb 13, 2002]
Leo
Weekend Warrior

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
2
Strength:

light, durable and secure once clipped in.

Weakness:

somtimes it's hard to tell when whether you're clipped in or not.

It works okay, but in technical sections, the pedals doesn't exactly inspire confidence when you can't tell if your in or not. At least exit is consistent.

Got the pedals with the bike. And can't believe that it costs more than Nashbar's despite being the same product. They look identical.

Similar Products Used:

toe clips and straps on platform pedals.

[Oct 06, 2003]
Tom
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Precise engagements
Double spring entry/single spring release.

Weakness:

Absolutely none.

These are the best pedals I have ever used. I used the Shimano 747 copy-Exus pedals for many years and still use them on my commuter bike. I had many problems with them. The onZa pedals were good, but not great like these ones. I recommend these pedals to anyone looking for an extremely dependable pedal in all XC situtations, mud included.

Similar Products Used:

Exus-EM2 (I think)
onZa H.O.X.
Wellgo (Ritchey copies)

[Jul 18, 2002]
Will
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
3
Strength:

+Looks cool (mine are red)
+Easy to get out of
+Durable

Weakness:

-Sometimes hard to get into (even with lots of fine-tuning of tension screw)
-Bushings were cool for their time but I can totally see the plusses to have bearings
-When muddy, they are hard as hell to get into
-No way to use an Allen wrench to install; I've got a new pair of Ritchey's & they are Allen-wrench friendly :)
-Sometimes too easy to get out of; not good when jumping
-The pedal cage can really hold a lot of mud
-Too many moving parts; less moving parts means less places for things to go wrong

These are great pedals as long as you take care of them from day-one. I was pretty bike-maintenance stupid and only started servicing these pedals within the last year.

They are a real pain when the pedals get muddy to "clip in." My fix is to give the pedal a good downward kick a few times to shake them out.

I'm saving up to get some pedals with serviceable bearings. The bushings on my pedals are squeakin' as they wear. You can always cram more lube into bearings and keep them quiet and smooth. Also, I just am not into things with so many moving parts. More moving parts means more pieces to give you a headache; I ride a hardtail:)

I agree with some other people, when you could probably by any SPD-compatible pedal & won't notice too much of a difference in performance.

Take care & keep riding!

[Oct 23, 2001]
David Fambrough
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Strength:

It's clipless.

Weakness:

Mud. Poor quality. (A screw eventually fell out during a ride.) Adjustability of tension. Got to hunt for the pedal to clip in, but that may be the result of the shoes I'm using.

Glad I didn't purchase these pedals; otherwise, I'd be disappointed. Funny how the knock-offs from Wellgo get better reviews. At least it showed me the benefits of riding clipless -- more power to the pedal. If money is no object, go with Time. When it comes to XC riding in the mud, reliability and light weight, you can't go wrong.

Similar Products Used:

These were my first introduction to clipless. Now I've upgraded to the Shimano 636 for better riding rocky, rooty, technical trails.

[Jul 08, 2001]
Matt
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Strength:

weighs less than shimano, but then again, what doesn't!

Weakness:

crappy bushing design, terrible release, disimproved cleat over original design (if it ain't broke ...)!
Makes an experienced rider feel like a 1st time SPD rookie.

This pedal is definitely _dangerous_! Parking lot performance may be acceptable, but out in the ruthless rock gardens of NW New Jersey, you do not want to be in some death trap that holds onto your foot 'till you hit the ground!
This pedal has only gotten worse with age. After only 12 months of use, I have major bushing play, noise, and friction. Neither grease nor oil will help.
As for the retention mechanism, no matter how clean or well lubed, the pedal has never shown a definite point of release. Sometimes I feel like I am twisting my foot 50 degrees or more -- and still don't get out until my leg slams into a rock!
Advice to Tom: make a pedal with the inboard bearing of the new Logic Pro, with the release mechanism of the old WCS and I might forgive you for the bruises and the pain!

Similar Products Used:

Shimano 535, 747, Ritchey WCS (bring it back!), Ritchey Logic Pro (same retarded cleat design!)

[Nov 13, 1998]
Joe Karp
weekend warrior

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING

I have standard Ritchey clipless on my '97 Stumpjumper and have had no problem with them yet. They do scratch up, but so do they all. Keeping them lubed and clean is the trick to clipping and unclipping. I appreciate it when I hit a snag and have to bail and they release just right every time. I found the correct way to adjust them is to loosen all the way and then tighten them up two clicks. I give them four chilis.

[Jul 20, 1999]
DonJ
Cross-Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
Strength:

Easy in and out. Low maint.

Weakness:

Mud is its worst enemy.

They take a beating and keep on clipping in. They tend to get clogged with mud easily and aren't very easy to clear out while in the elements. Allow for rotation through the pedal stroke (without releasing), relieving the strain on knees, especially on the true grinding climbs. No signs of wear on the spindles or clip area. If these break or inevitably wear out, I'll buy another pair just like them.

Similar Products Used:

too many

[Apr 08, 1999]
Bill
Cross-Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
Strength:

Look good

Weakness:

Hard to unclip even at lightest setting.

These were my first clipless pedals. And I always liked them except that they've been hard to pop out of. I had them at their absolute lightest setting. I've ridden with them over 2000 miles so they're broken in! I finally figured I'd try something else when I fell twice this weekend because I couldn't unclip.So I tried the Shimano 545's. What a difference. First of all the shimano's click when you adjust the tension so it's easy to get both pedals to the same setting. And the range of adjustment is much greater. They're so much easier to get in and out of. I'm hooked on shimano's pedals from now on.Also, regarding the wieght, they weigh about the same as the 545's and the 545's have a big metal platform so you can ride more comfortably withought cleats. So even though they're kind of low profile, they're not that light.

Similar Products Used:

Shimano 545

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