Ibis Tranny XC Hardtail

DESCRIPTION

No, this isn?t something conceived under surgical lights in Trinidad, CO. The Ibis Tranny comes from the fertile minds at Ibis Cycles and is capable of quick and easy transformations from multiple gears to single-speed. It's light, strong, and ready for your next cross-country race or all day adventure. It even functions as the coolest, super-packable travel bike we?ve ever seen.The Tranny is molded as a carbon fiber monocoque in two unique sections. The one piece front triangle looks fairly normal save for two spots -- the seatstay and chainstay junctions. These locations are designed to accept the rear triangle to produce the complete frame. At the seatstay junction, the wishbone is effectively bolted into a double shear bracket on the back of the seat tube and is shaped to allow a small degree of radial movement. This movement is essential for the bike to function as a single-speed. The junction behind the bottom bracket area is called the Slot Machine. As the name implies, there is a slot that allows the clamping hardware in the chainstays to have some fore and aft movement. This range of adjustment permits tensioning of the chain in single-speed applications, negating the need for an eccentric bottom bracket. Pull the Slot Machine all the way forward and you can run the Tranny geared with short chainstays for razor-like handling in tight trails. Toss the cassette and extra rings in the bin and run it as a single-speed with the Slot Machine pulled rearwards a bit, just enough to tension the chain. Are you flying somewhere for a mountain biking vacation? Just unbolt the whole enchilada and pack the thing away neatly in a suitcase and check it as regular baggage.For all its utility, the Ibis Tranny remains true to its race-proven, hardtail roots. With its unified carbon construction, it is optimized for stiffness here and vibration damping there. It has top tube cable routing and a bolt-on alloy seatpost clamp. The removable cable stops for the front and rear derailleurs are a cool feature -- they get sandwiched under the bolt-on rear brake hose guides. No gears? Simply remove them and there will be no unsightly remnants to spoil the purity of your adventures. And, the single-speed specific dropout offers a nice bottle opener for post-ride celebrations.The Tranny is available in four sizes ? Small, Medium, Large, and XL and comes in Matte Clear (over naked carbon), Granny Smith Apple Green Metallic, and Copper Metallic. The Ibis Tranny is designed for use with a 100mm fork. It takes a 31.6mm seatpost and a 34.9mm traditional top-pull front derailleur. It features IS disc brake tabs and the aluminum headset cups accept a Cane Creek or similar IS integrated headset. 3.0 lbs (1360 g).Ibis Cycles offers a 3 year warranty on the Tranny frame. Please follow this link to register your new bike.Note: Not all front derailleurs will work with this frame. Please check the compatibility here.

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-5 of 5  
[Jan 29, 2013]
sloppyart
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

QUICK! This thing accelerates like a Ferrari. Climbs like a mountain goat. Handles like a dream. Light. As a single speed it weighs in at about 19 lbs the way I have it built up. Around 21 lbs as a 1x11 (XX1).

Some have noted that the design to tension the chain is over engineered which is true if you don't plan on travelling with this bike...but if you do it's fantastic. I rarely travel anywhere without bringing this bike with me.

Weakness:

Rear brake routing could be improved. It works fine when I have it set up as a single speed because you can remove the derailleur guides and then hold the brake line in with a zip tie...but once you set it up as a geared bike you can't put a zip tie in there as the derailleur guides fill up the hole to run the zip tie through. Most of the time the housing stays put but occasionally you'll look down and it's come out of the guide. Not a huge deal to feed it back in...but it sure would be nice if it was locked down.

I purchased this bike for the smoother trails around me. Also as a bonus it breaks down to fit in a case where the airlines won't charge you extra to check it. I now ride this bike the majority of the time (my other bike is a Giant Trance X1). Obviously when you get into some rough stuff it's nice to have the dual boingers...but overall I enjoy this bike more because it handles so well and climbs better than anything else I've ever ridden.

Takes about 15 minutes to break down and 30 minutes to put back together. To fit in in the case you pretty much need to remove all of the parts off the bike. I wrap anything sharp in a rag. Also you need to let some of the air out of the tires to fit it in the case.

With all the tools to put it back together, the bike and the case it weighs in pretty close to the 50lb limit most airlines have. I bring a torque wrench to make sure the slot machine is torqued correctly...but I probably could skip that to save some weight for travelling. Make sure you weigh everything before you go to the airport. Also make sure all of your tools are checked as security will sometimes not let you on the plane with bike tools since you could obviously overtake an entire plane with a chain-whip. :P


[Apr 01, 2012]
mattwatkins
Racer

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Versatile, lightweight, clever design. Ibis are renowned for their excellent customer service.

Weakness:

Slot machine does suffer from some dirt/dust ingress, so cleaning is required periodically.

A really beautifully designed frame. The Tranny is extremely versatile but I think it really is at its best when setup as a singlespeed. You can remove the gear stops and parts related to deraileur cables. Since the frame doesn't have sliding dropouts or other fuss this results in a very neat and tidy look. Shame the bottle opener doesn't come with the frame as standard, though. With a rigid carbon fork mine weighs less than 17 pounds, so it's lighter than many competitive road bikes. It really screams up hills and is a pleasure to flick about on tight and twisty trails, particularly in the woods. I can't imagine any other bike I would rather ride in this configuration. There's no noticeable flex introduced by the design of the backend and it might also be useful that the rear part of the frame could be replaced separately if it suffered damage. Can't really fault the guys at Ibis. I've been riding a Mojo SL for four years and when it came to getting my next bike I was more than happy to go back to them. In the naked carbon finish both bikes turn a lot of heads.

Similar Products Used:

Ibis Mojo SL, Cannondale Killer V, Litespeed Ghisallo, Ribble Stealth

[Apr 25, 2010]
Freegan Bikefascist
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

- vertical compliance amazing (feels almost like a softtail)
- Lateral stiffness all there
- accellerates out of corners like nothing I've ridden short of a road bike
- Light yet comfy yet stiff

Weakness:

- weight not as advertised. Mine is 1500gr (ok still light enough)
- SS dropout is an aftermarket extra (a bit mean for a $1500 frame)
- slotmachine is an overcomplex solution to chaintensioning. sliding dropouts would have been simpler and lighter

To start with a negative, I must say that given the option, I'd probably go with sliding dropouts rather than the slot machine, which I find a bit of an overcomplex solution to a simple problem (chain tensioning) especially as I have yet to fly with it. That said, it works so wth. The slotmachine also provides a nice mudshelf behind the BB, although this has been less trouble than I thought it would be over a winter's mud-plugging in Belgium. I copter taped the inside surfaces of the stays just in case, but running 2.1s High rollers, have seen no scouring so far. I'll change these to 2.35s when the current ones wear out.

Frame weight on my medium copper was *not* as advertised, coming in at 1500g incl the frame bolting hardware and seat collar but it's still as light as a decent alu frame and the vertical compliance in it is nothing short of amazing given how laterally stiff it is. Riding in the saddle over flemish cobbles, you'd be forgiven for thinking you're on a softtail. yet when you lay the hammer down it responds immediately.

I have mine singlespeeded with Easton XC one wheels (which are quite stiff) and a RS SID Team fork. It bloody flies, the accelleration, especially out of corners, is quite something and I look forward to riding it at the SSWC this year (first time I'll get to travel with it) not that I'll be "competing" as such, more of a take part and try to get to the end, affair!

The ride is superb, I like the steep(ish) HA and would happily chuck it at welsh trails and centres like the Gap, if I could get over my own paranoia at the impact resistance of carbon matched with the replacement value.

I originally fitted it up with a (nukeproof) carbon rigid fork but quickly realised that the frame is a lot better than that, it kept wanting to go places that my confidence in the fork wouldn't let me go. Much better balanced with the SID up front now. for me 100mm is where it's at handling wise, but I'm not too keen on slacker angled bikes so personal preference and all that.

If you want it for singlespeeding, beware that the frame comes with the normal dropout, the SS specific one is an extra (a bit tight on a frame this pricey I think). Dunno what 2pure's accessories prices are like but while I was dissapointed not to get the SS dropout included with the frame, I was happy that Ibis don't gouge too badly for the part

I'd give it 5 stars if they had been honest about the weight (I expect 1350 is small in nude?) and if the price wasn't quite so staggeringly high but if you can get past the price, this is one beautiful bike

one final wish, I really wish they'd have gone with a direct mount front D. the waisted seattube is a visual compromise to gearing that I would have preferred to be without.

Similar Products Used:

Giant XTC carbon (not as stiff)
Cannondale F1000 (not as comfy)

[Dec 21, 2009]
TITUSIBIS
Weekend Warrior

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Light, good Versatility, very all round, bike canbe travel in regular case when rea end detached

Weakness:

Sand and mud get into the joint and hard to clean up without detaching rear end

Reason price when compare with other carbon frames. It is amazing that almost no extra energy lose to the rear joint, power will get through the rear join all the way to the wheel. detachable end make the frame a little heavier but still light enough, just below 3Lbs. Apple green make the bike conspicious when riding in a group.

Similar Products Used:

GT Zaska 08 reissue

[Jun 09, 2009]
chinesegrump
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

light, solid, and stiff frame. Slot machine is a cool and solid way used to tension the ss chain set up. You can rally dial it in.

Weakness:

none discovered yet.

This frame was built up to single speed and it is fantastic. Nice and stiff and seems to rail the corners with the Sid locked out. There has been NO issues with the slot machine. Go to the IBIS website to see how this works. It is a slick design with really no headaches. A bit nervous about cranking on the slot machine's bolts to 15 foot lbs... recommended torque. It is a fun ride. Looking for a hardtail... this is a great frame. Want a cool ss... this is it!

Similar Products Used:

Kona Hei Hei (circa late 90's) Ti frame built up as a ss with a chain tensioner.

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