Devinci Troy 27.5 Full Suspension

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-5 of 5  
[Oct 15, 2018]
RidePNW


OVERALL
RATING
5
Strength:

This bike is an amazing descender. I'm so much more confident rolling or flying over obstacles. I wanted a do everything trail/light enduro bike that could be pressed into bike park service on occasion. This is the bike. I can climb up the same hills as on by XC race bike (26", 120-F/130-R MM travel) but can bomb down hills I wouldn't imaging taking that bike down. Some of the YouTube reviews describe this bike as playful. I couldn't agree more - it wants to pop off every trail feature and gets airborne on suggestion. It's also super plush on impact. I've always been a Fox guy, but this combination of the Monarch and Pike has me impressed. The Pike in particular shines on this bike. I have the carbon frame with the Eagle GX build. The only changes I've made is to go tubeless with the tires, cut the bars, and swap out the stock grips for Northshore Lizard Skins. I even like the stock seat, something that hasn't happened in my entire bike riding history. I'm TBD on the RaceFace dropper, but so far so good. I got this on closeout from my LBS and have been nothing but pleased since purchase. I knew nothing about Devinci before buying as they have almost no presence in the PNW - at least south of the border. With the Troy, I can see that changing.

Weakness:

Sizing is interesting. I usually ride smalls, but ended up choosing the medium in the Troy. No regrets, but the cockpit may feel small if you get your normal size. The stand over height wasn't a penalty in sizing up and the reach felt right. It has a chip for high/low, but from my research, no one has ever flipped this bike to ride high. I like the feel of the low position, but YMMV. Much like other low slung all mountain bikes, you are trading stability for the occasional pedal strike. This has been true for me and makes me glad for alloy cranks.

Price Paid:
3500
Purchased:
New  
Model Year:
2018
[Sep 30, 2015]
mudgirl
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Just the right amount of travel, Maneuverable, Climbs well, Solid Descender

Weakness:

Wheelbase is a bit long for tight switchbacks and corners

I have been riding the Troy for just about 6 months now. I debated between a carbon XP build and the aluminum XP build, and in the end I chose the aluminum frame and upgraded the wheelset to Stan's Flows and this bike came with Nobby Nics rather than Hans Dampf tires. I already had a Reverb dropper post that I installed on it, and a couple months ago I broke the front brake lever in a crash and ended up replacing the front Shimano Deore brake with an XT. I don't really notice a huge difference in the braking between the XT and Deore. Everything else is stock.

I have been enjoying this bike quite a lot this season. I bought the Troy because I wanted something that was more aggressive and capable of handling rougher terrain than I have been riding in the past. I was riding a Giant Anthem 29er prior to this bike, and I really expected the DeVinci to be a slug on the uphills considering the increased travel and slacker lines. I was wrong, though, and I think the DeVinci actually climbs better than my Anthem does, at least on the chunk and gnarl. I am a scaredy cat when it comes to super steep downhills, and this bike has definitely given me more confidence in tackling some DH sections that I used to skip. The Troy feels extremely solid at speed and rails through corners. I am pretty aggressive on the DHs that I do tackle, and I have not felt the fork or the shock bottom out, and the bike has held up extremely well overall. I think this is an all around wonderful trail bike, but not an "enduro" bike. I didn't want something as aggressive as the Spartan, and I think this was the perfect choice for my riding style, which is more aggressive than your average xc, but not quite into drops and jumps over a couple feet.

I am notorious with my bike shop mechanics for being hard on my bikes and breaking components constantly. I've so far only managed to break a brake lever off and bend the rear rotor, so now it sings to me. I leave the shock in trail mode and have never felt the need to change it to descend or climb. Even when I'm pushing big gears on pavement, I don't feel any movement in the frame. Overall, I'm very happy with this bike!

[Jun 10, 2014]
pulpwoody
All Mountain Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Bad a$$ climber, quick and nimble handling, handles like a razor and the rear suspension is simple and crazy good. Devinici customer service is fantastic. LIfe time warranty on the frame.

Weakness:

I wish the BB was a bit higher. Oh well.

I've been ridding this amazing bike since November of 2013, and I'm still blown away by the everything that is the Troy.

After 6 months of riding, I kinda figured that I would just get used to the bike, and it would fade into the background, become a ho-hum experience, like so many things do after the new smell wears off.

Hell no.

Literally, every ride on this bike since I got it has been a blast, and if there's any exceptions to that, it's certainly not because of the bike. It does every single thing I ask it to do, climbing, descending, accelerating, cornering, and it does each one incredibly well.

One of the big deciding factors in buying the frame was the lifetime warranty from Devinici. There aren't that many bike companies out there offering a lifetime warranty on their frames, so score, BIG TIME.

Beyond how well the bike rides, the Devinici customer service has been outstanding. I had a super small amount of play in the upper shock bolt/bushing interface that I could not fix. I called Devinici directly, yes, on the phone, and talked to Manuel, who told me what the problem was before I had a chance to. At no charge, he mailed a special set of DU bushings to my LBS, Motorangutan here in Austin, and it solved the problem. When you spend this much money on a bike, you need to know that the manufacturer is going to stand behind their product, and so far, Devinici is tops.

In six months, the bike has been rock solid, no problems, and ridden really hard. That's the thing about the Troy, you can't help but ride like a man possessed, it's just more fun that way. The internal cable routing is really slick, and adjusting the geometry is easy enough. The only thing I would change, would be to raise the BB a little. In Austin, there's a s%!t tons of limestone rock ledges, and since this suspension works so damn well, sitting and climbing means pedal strikes or re-ratcheting the cranks.

This is the only bike I've ever ridden where I feel like I'm in total control, all the time. Other bikes were too heavy, the suspension didn't work as well, were hard to climb, or not responsive enough. When I'm on the Troy, I feel like I could change directions in mid-air, like Mario dodging Bowsers fireball.

Overall, a 110% satisfied Troy owner and Devinici fan boy.

Similar Products Used:

Giant Trance, Pivot Firebird, Banshee Spitfire, Kona Process, Rocky Mountain Element, all 27.5.

[Apr 13, 2014]
Zach Wagner
All Mountain Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

Reasonably light for a full suss, 27.5 bike, solid descender, incredible drive train, beautiful frame, good parts spec for the price, solid climber with help from Fox CTD tech, good wheelset, good tires (if you like the hans dampf), best dropper seat post there is (if you like dropper posts), sublime cable routing

Weakness:

Could be lighter for a 27.5 full suss bike (especially with such a simplistic drive train), bar awesome looking but too wide (for my taste), tires heavy and slow rolling (if you don't like the hans dampf, which I didn't really), dropper post adds a decent amount of unnecessary (in my opinion and for my riding) weight

Review is for the Devinici Troy RR Carbon version

When I first saw the Troy, my jaw about hit the floor. While opinions will of course differ, I find it to be one of the most beautifully crafted bike frames available. Beautiful lines, just the right curves, fabulous cable routing, amazingly awesome and simple drive train, Kashima coated fox shock and fork... it's a thing to behold to be sure.
I paid $6599 for mine, and I think for that price the parts spec is solid.

Elixir 9 brakes aren't top of the line, but they provide ample stopping power and don't seem to fade much.

The shock and fork are gorgeous, Kashima coated Fox CTD offerings, with 34 stanchions up front for that extra bit of stiffness (yes, you will notice it). They perform as they should, and seem to have good compression. I wouldn't call the fork the plushest thing on the planet (my Manitou Tower Pro on my 29er takes that honor), but it's solid and performs very well. I tried out the settings and pressure when I first got the bike, but after a few rides just started leaving it in Descend full time, which works well. The shock is very nice as well, and I love the CTD tech that Fox is now employing. Trail setting basically works for just about anything, and I don't find a reason to switch it to Climb under any circumstance. I like to have a bit of give on climbs, as it can help with obstacles. Descend is a little too soft for climbs in my opinion, because while the split pivot suspension system is quite good, it's not flawless, and you'll get some bob if your getting after it on climbs if you leave it in Descend.

The Easton Haven wheels are pretty great so far. They aren't the lightest wheels on the planet at around 1650/set, but they give a good compromise between stiffness and weight. They are nice looking as well, which doesn't hurt.

The RockShox Reverb Stealth seat post is pretty incredible. It routes out at the bottom inside of the main triangle, then back into the frame and out at the bars. It works flawlessly, and for someone who is into that sort of thing, it's the best of the best. I'm not, and even though I tried it, I didn't care for it and it adds a decent amount of weight, so I replaced it with an FSA S-LK carbon post, which is much lighter and works perfect for me.

Tires will always be a personal affair, and for me the Hans Dampf, while quite nice and quite grippy, were just too slow and heavy for my more cross country-oriented taste. I replaced the rear with a Racing Ralph 2.25 Snakeskin (a personal favorite tire of mine), and with it the bike feels quite a bit quicker. Little less grip, but I'll happily trade for the speed. The front got replaced with a 2.35 Nobby Nic, which is lighter than the Dampf, still has some decent knobs (especially on the sides for cornering), but has a better, lower, faster rolling center profile.

The last replacement was the handlebar, which comes originally as a Chromag Fubar OSX. I loved the name and the look of the Fubar, but the width was just too much for me and my type of riding. So I replaced it with a Forte Carbon CR720, which is lighter and not nearly as wide (720mm compared to the Fubar's 780mm).

The drive train is simply incredible. I've been waiting for this for years. Finally, a beautifully constructed, simple 1x11 gear system that not only saves on weight, but shifts flawlessly. With a 30 up front and 10-42 in the rear, it's ready for all but the steepest climbs, and can get after some pretty sick downhills as well. I simply can't say enough about this drive train. It's perfect. The X0 rear derailleur is beautiful and beefy, and shifts are effortless (and in many gears almost completely silent, whilst out in the thick of it), while the chain stays sufficiently taught. The chain is proprietary to the system and is designed to not fall off; I have yet to pop it and I really have a hard time imagining a circumstance that would. Coming from 2x10, I don't find I'm missing anything really; the lowest gear isn't *quite* as low as the lowest on my previous 2x10, so some climbs have proven a bit more difficult, but hey, I'll just have to get stronger, huh? Seriously, hands down (EASILY), the best drive train I've ever used on a mountain bike. Pure joy.

The split pivot suspension system is not necessarily the best pedaling platform I've used, and having never used a DW Link system (purported to be the best), I can only say that I would likely place split pivot in the 'above average' category, but certainly not the best. When combined with the Fox CTD in either Climb or Trail, it's a worthy climber. With the tires replaced and the seat post and handlebars changed out to lighten things up a bit, it feels very nimble on ascent. Overall the bike is very nimble.

On descent the Troy is a more than capable companion, eating rock gardens and mid to large sized drops for breakfast. I ran out of letters here, so I'll close by saying the bike kicks ass! Cheers!

Similar Products Used:

GT Sensor 9r, Fisher HiFi Deluxe, Fisher Rumblefish, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Expert, Fuji SLM, Motobecane Fly Ti 29er, many, many more...

[Jan 05, 2014]
Carraig042
Downhiller

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Strong carbon bike
Lifetime warranty on frame
great price for the build
Full internal cable routing including dropper post
Fox Kashima shock with CTD, Rockshox Pike up front
Good climber and great descender
Nice wide bars stock 785mm
Hans Dampf tires
Type 2 derailleur
Can mix and match frame and build kits with Devinci

Weakness:

No dropper post on XP build kit.
Not the lightest carbon bike out there (Has lifetime warranty though)
2x10 setup on drivetrain (I like the simplicity of a 1x10)
Avid Elixer 3 brakes (they work fine, but aren't great or what I ma used to)

The bike is all around great, It is the Dh'ers trail bike in my eyes. It feels like it has more travel than the 140/150 it actually has. It pedals really good on various types of terrain including the flowy trails, uphills, and over rocky/rooty sections. It was easy to set up, Devinci has some good suspension set-up videos for newer people. Now the part the DH people will like, it is slack enough to shred downhills really good. It gives a good stable feel at speed.

One of the best things about Devinci is that you can buy whichever frame you want and any build kit for that model as well. I did just that with mine. I bought the carbon frame with Kashima float shock and the XP build kit for the value. Overall the price is extremely hard to beat. You get a carbon frame, Kashima Fox shock, Rockshox Pike, X7 type 2 drivetrain, and nice stiff wheels and good Hans Dampf tires.

I also really like that it has internal cable routing. Though it is a small thing, but it makes for a clean look and less chance of crimped cables. I would recommend this bike to anyone who wants to try something different for a change. The 27.5 wheels roll well and are still nimble for technical riding. It is great for someone who is used to riding aggressively like a DH'er does. Simply put, I have not had this much on a trail bike to date.

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