Post Moderne Suspension Seatpost Suspension Seatpost

Moderne Suspension Seatpost

Post Moderne Suspension Seatpost

User Reviews (102)

Showing 1-10 of 102  
Martin   Cross Country Rider [Oct 01, 2002]
Weakness:

Cross hatching wore off so seat moves up and down now.

Bought Thudbuster to replace it.

Similar Products Used: Only suspension seatpost I've used last 3 years.
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
pokey   Cross Country Rider [Jan 18, 2002]
Strength:

This is for the Bracer post. The post is well made, has an easy to adjust 2 bolt clamp an is a nice ano black with dust boot.

Weakness:

MCU spring stiff in freezing temps.

Postmoderne sent me free of chg 2 coil/mcu set ups for this post. The post works well in freezing temps with the coil/mcu. Time will tell how it holds up. Good post with great company support. 4 and 4 flamers untill it passes the test of time.

Similar Products Used: none
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Mick Lansing   Cross Country Rider [Sep 26, 2006]
Weakness:

I cannot get this post to move properly. It sticks so much and needs a ton of weight on it to get any sort of movement. Nice post but useless. I am very disappointed

I also have had to send this post back, via the shop, to the manufacturers. I cannot get any sort of smooth movement or any movement and I am really disappointed. Just to get the point across...when I took this shock post off of the bike...and put a normal "hard" post on...I didn't notice any difference! And that is no exeggeration. There has got to be some manufacturing fault in this batch.

Similar Products Used: USE XC and XCR.
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Ron   Weekend Warrior [Jan 05, 2004]
Strength:

Seat clamp centered over post, reduces stiction

Weakness:

It's black, I prefer silver components. Needs special tools for routine user service.


This review is for the Post Moderne Solace Comp.

I have only used the product for three months, and so, I cannot comment on long term reliability.

The seatpost is more expensive than many other $30-$40 CDN suspension seatposts. Luckily, I found a sale for $50 CDN, or about $35 USD. Normal price was $85 CDN.

At full price this product seems to be in the middle price range. It is not among the least expensive, but not among the most expensive either. It falls about half way between.

I bought it because I had a bad experience with a cheap suspension seatpost, and I heard good things about the Post Moderne. I figured to spend a bit more for a better design and more durability.

My first observation was that the seatpost is a bit on the heavy side. Being a recreational rider, I opted to save some money by buying the heavier Solace Comp on sale. The alternatives were the lighter more expensive Post Moderne Bracer or the RockShox.

One thing that bugs me is the need for a special "extra long shaft" hex key, to take the seatpost apart for regular lubrication servicing. I do not have this tool and have no idea where to get one. Clearly, if I have to buy a special tool, the only use for which is servicing this seatpost, then the tool cost has to be added to the cost of the seatpost, when comparing products.

IMHO, this tool should come with the seatpost, since it is necessary for regular maintenance and is not a standard tool that one typically has laying about, like a hammer or screw driver.

I am 185lbs plus gear and I find that with zero preload, I get zero sag. This seems strange, since many riders are significantly lighter.

I found also, that the ride is noticeably harder in colder weather, presumably due to cold stiff elastomers. However, unlike others who contacted Post Moderne and received new parts to deal with the cold weather, my e-mail to Post Moderne has been ignored, and I have never received any sort of reply.

The seat clamp is centered directly over the seatpost shaft, instead of cantilevered behind the shaft. This helps reduce stiction. This arrangement is now being used in many of the better MTB suspension seatposts, like the RockShox. I have not yet encountered any problems with stiction.

I find that the seat swivels a bit, but I can live with it. I tightened the adjustment screws to correct this, but the problem soon returned. I may adjust it again if it really starts to annoy me.

I ride mostly local dirt roads and rolling XC trails with the occasional roots, holes, and exposed rocks. With 50mm (2 inches) of travel, the Solace Comp smooths out most of the ride fairly well. That's what I wanted.

For bigger hits I have to get off the seat, or I'll get bucked off. That seems to be typical of suspension seatposts, and not unique to the Solace Comp. Perhaps the AP-1 is better, since it has more travel and dampening.

I do not know if the seatpost bottoms out. I have not perceived this happening. There is no noticeable jarring, indicating that I have exhausted the range of travel, even when I get bucked out of the seat on a big hit. This may have something to do with the Giant seat, which is very comfy.

I would recommend this seatpost for recreational riders who are unwilling to spend the big bucks for a Thudbuster, RoxShox, or AP-1.

You sacrifice a bit on weight compared to the most expensive, but still get reasonable performance. So, far the Solace Comp has lived up to those expectations.

Similar Products Used: Tranz-X JD-415, a friend's Thudbuster
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Harry Sharp   Weekend Warrior [Mar 24, 2003]
Strength:

Very smooth motion, easy adjust of preload, no lateral movement.

Weakness:

None, however, if you allow it to get submerged in water (I did when we got flooded and I tried to cycle through water that was above the handle bars) then the performance drops because the thing gets filled with water. So you have to follow the nice manual on how to completely take the thing apart and rebuild.

Worth buying if your doing lots of tracks with potholes or some XC riding. It really takes the edge off any bumps with 50mm of travel. Cheaper than paying for a decent full sussie and yet has a good effect.

Similar Products Used: None
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Jakob Thyness   Cross-Country Rider [Jul 16, 1999]
Strength:

Nice action

Weakness:

Binds when subjected to lateral force, poor clamp design

I bought this seatpost out of curiosity, just to see if a suspension seatpost would improve the ride. I was very impressed with the action of the post, except that the post tended to bind if you weren't seated directly above its centre. There were no instructions included with the post, so adjustments had to be done by trial and error. Also, I couldn't get the clamp tight enough to keep the seat horizontal, and eventually stripped the threads trying. As I understand it, my post used the new clamp design, but in my opinion, it needs to be revised further to make the post usable. A potentially good product marred by some serious weaknesses.

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
kevin   cross-country rider [Oct 03, 1998]

what a great steal for $60.00 - just got finished riding typical pa single track consisting of rocks, roots, short steep loose gravel uphills - and I can't tell you how nice it is to finish a ride w/o a sore lower back. (I am 34 yrs old, so my back is getting old) I ride a c'dale caad3 & this suspension post sure takes the sting out of a stiff ride. I was able to climb rocky uphills better, and was able to stay seated while riding over rock fields. A helluva lotta fun for the price of a pair of kevlar tires. I can only go 4 stars - have not had it long enough to justify a 5 star rating.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
Stephen Cooper   racer [Sep 20, 1998]

I ride a hardtail, and this post takes enough of the edge off bumps that I can ride faster on cross-country descents. In short, I really like it for the riding I do.I had a problem with the internals of the post creaking, the same sound as a tired bottom bracket makes. The suggestions in Ed's post (8/16) helped, but didn't eliminate the noise. I emailed Jane at Supergo, and she suggested putting a bit of bicycle oil into the post. That fixed it completely! It's easy to do: take the post off the bike and flip it over. On the bottom is a threaded plug; use an allen wrench to unscrew it. Pull out the elastomer, the circular plastic cup, and the spring. You can then see the bottom end of the shaft. Squirt a bit of oil on the shaft (I used Pedro's Syn ATB), and reassemble. Make sure to screw the threaded plug in until it's flush with the bottom of the post.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
LANE   cross-country rider [Sep 25, 1998]

Stiction. Gotta lube it all the time. No problem. Slides down. Kind of a problem. Bends @ 5 degrees. That's a problem. The post cracks about half way around. Took it off. I weigh 175 and ran it @ 1 1/4 below max height line. Keep an eye on this one and think about your nads, too. I would have given it a couple of chilies before it cracked.

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
Neil Richards   downhiller [Sep 22, 1998]

After owning 3 different brands of downhill bike and having trouble using them as all pourpose bikes I bought an aluminium hard tail to train on which is pretty harsh . I decided to buy a post moderne and have had it for a couple of months now, this seat post is awsome it does the job it was designed to do for a great price it takes out all of the small and medium bumps . Just remember it is not a dual suspension bike and it is not meant to be you've got to stand up over rough terrain and on descents. I used threadlock to keep the seat firmly in place and have had no trouble so far.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
Showing 1-10 of 102  

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