X-Fusion O2 RCX Rear Shock

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X-Fusion O2 RCX Rear Shock 

DESCRIPTION

Updated compression and rebound tuning based on rider feedback over the last year from on and off the race circuit. Knobs and adjusters with more aggressive detents to ensure the rider does not miss the intended adjustment position. Seal designs and materials optimize performance and increase durability. Chassis ensures consistent quality during production assembly. Air sleeve provides a lower air-spring compression ratio.

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-3 of 3  
[Apr 27, 2016]
championp
All Mountain Rider

Strength:

factory tune option to suit my frames kinematics. Linear feel on 120mm travel with perfect ramp-up. Plush off the top with good support before final ramp up. Useful rebound and LSC adjustments with good tactile feel on adjustment knobs. Easy to install, plug and play. Definite upgrade in performance over the microlite RL which it replaced.It's easy to use full travel and has a gentle bottom out that you can't feel while riding. Large range of useful sag from 20 all the way to 40% with no noticeable drawbacks. Stays supple at high speeds as well as low speeds, great control on fast downhills as well as slow tech downhills. It has 4 clicks of low speed compression and not just 3 levels of pedaling platform/lockout, and each click makes a significant difference, as does the rebound settings. Once tuned in it is set and forget - it holds it's pressure well enough that i don't have to check it.

Weakness:

The compression lever can accidentally be bumped when using the water bottle. The 4th low speed compression position (the firmest one) is almost like a lockout. Many people would find this to be an advantage for fire road climbing but I don't have many trails like that in my area and would prefer a lighter setting closer to the feel of the other 3 settings. Most climbing is on singletrack so i prefer more active for traction on climbs.

I bought this shock because I had in store credit that i needed to use and I really liked the x-fusion trace rl fork and Microlite RL shock that came OEM on my 120mm 29er. Even though I was happy with the microlite, I thought the microlite ramped up a little too fast for my DH riding style and local trails, plus I have no preference for lockouts. I was happy with it's performance in other areas and really pleased with the fork so I chose their top of the line trail shock over the ccdb inline and I have been super happy with my choice. I thought it was prudent to get the x-fusion factory tune to match my frame, it is $50 at the time of purchase and I think it has been what made the biggest difference in it's performance. I generally leave the compression in the 1st of 4 settings (lightest/open) but occasionally use the 2nd setting and it is still plush while giving good stability over slow chunky stuff. If I leave it on I still get good enough performance in other parts of the trail so I'll leave it on to keep the mid stroke support, especially in rolling hills and twisty terrain. I started out with lower pressure, but after more hours on the shock it has even less friction than out of the box. This allows me to increase the air spring pressure and bottom out less while still having a plush ride. it gets plusher overtime I ride it. I have bikes with RS monarch, and Fox float and I was able to demo the DB inline on two bikes and the new 2016 fox and I genuinely prefer the sensitivity and support of the O2 RCX. I've only had it a short time but I had perfect durability out of the microlite and this shock seems beefier so durability shouldn't be a problem.

Similar Products Used:

Monarch RL Monarch RT3 Fox float R propedal, fox float ctd 2013. 2015, and 2016. DB inline for 2, 2 hour demos

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
[Jul 20, 2014]
Alainzen
All Mountain Rider

Strength:

None so far

Weakness:

Difficult to tune
No "happy all-around" set up
Noisy when suspension extend
Expensive

I installed the shock on my Devinci Dixon 2012 and went for one of my regular ride of 22 miles ride / 3100 ft climbing and I could not get my bike's rear suspension to work normally despite all my attempts to set up the shock.

I am 200lbs and I tried all the possible set up to adjust the sag and rebound. By the way, this is not my first X-Fusion rear shock. A "hard stop" noise (metal to metal contact) can be heard when the suspension extends after compression if I set the initial sag at 20-25% (10-13mm / 50mm). It disappeared with a 30-35% set up but ended up being a way too soft and affecting the geometry.
On the trail, the rear shock is not predictable by tending to lock (or not) over the rocky section regardless of the damper adjustment position (I had a pump with me). I never had this problem with the Fox Float RP23 that the X-Fusion shock is supposed to replace. It is very difficult to keep control of your bike when the rear suspension decides to lock over baby head size rocks. On the other end, the rebound also seem to have a mind on his own by not being predictable feeling that the suspension is not controlled and kicking you when you go over 3-4 smooth bumps in a row.

I am not happy at all with my ride with X-Fusion as the trails that I nailed on a regular basis became a challenge using the same bike and setup minus the rear shock. It is just not fun. Now, let's see how X-Fusion handles my claim...

Similar Products Used:

Fox Float RP23, Fox Float RP23 Boostvalve, Rock Shox

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
2
[Mar 28, 2011]
martylane
Cross Country Rider

Strength:

Smooth stroke, wide range of rebound adjustment, 3 levels of compression platform damping.

Weakness:

No full lockout; can't fine tune compression preset levels.

I bought this shock as a replacement for the X-fusion O2 R shock that came stock on my Pitch. The Pitch bobs like mad when hammering out of the saddle, so I was looking for some compression damping. This RCX is a later model X-fusion shock than my O2 R. It has the same wide range of rebound adjustment, but doesn't seem to dive into the mid range as quickly, so I run slightly lower air pressure with the RCX. There are three preset levels of "platform" damping. At the firmest level, the bike still bobs a bit when out of the saddle, but the platform is very firm. You wouldn't want to use this setting on rocky trails.

Mostly, I wanted the platform for long road and firm dirt road stretches ridden to access trails. The firmest platform setting handles this well, but I sometimes wonder if I'd be better off with the RLX, which supposedly has full lockout and a single platform setting. Having three levels of platform from which to choose on the RCX, though, turns out to be a really nice feature I'm not sure I'd trade this feature for full lockout. I'd always assumed the Pitch pedals just fine when seated, but being able to add a little platform, or a little more noticeably enhances efficiency in some situations, like when climbing on rough terrain. I find that I do use the three levels of compression damping for different situations. Full open on descents is sensitive and smooth, and you can't beat the price. No complaints on this shock!

Similar Products Used:

None (past 7 years spent riding an Epic.)

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-3 of 3  

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