Manitou Minute One 2004 Front Shocks

Minute One

Manitou's Minute line offers their new stable platform valve (SPV), one of the most sophisticated damping technologies ever developed. With SPV, your fork is extremely active, soaking up bumps, but highly resistant to pedal induced bob.

User Reviews (34)

Showing 1-10 of 34  
msimp   Weekend Warrior [Nov 11, 2010]
Strength:

adjustable travel rebound and a good bit of travel

Weakness:

blows out, loses air compression as you ride, bottoms out

my brother and i bought two of these at a bike show a couple of years ago his was the newer black one and i got a cheaper older silver one. his worked pretty good it could be very stiff if you wanted or you could make it real soft. mine worked fine until i went off about a 3 or 4 foot drop then they just felt like crap it was just on the springs i tried putting more air in but it would just leak right out so i got rid of them. my brothers pair is still good and working and he took it off the same drop i did. i guess if you get these spend the extra money on them instead of trying to buy them cheap. he bought his for $100 and i got mine for $50. i wouldnt pay over 125 for them though.

Similar Products Used: rock shox sidi, newer manitou minute
OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
5
Dan   Cross Country Rider [Feb 12, 2007]
Strength:

looks, weight, SPV (so far), 'big' hit absorption

Weakness:

terrible rebound adjustment, no compression adjustment, difficult to adjust SPV pressure accurately.

Decent fork. I like the performance this fork offers, and you can fid them brand new for 200 bucks on eBay. The biggest hits I throw at this fork are 2-3 foot drops. All mtn stuff, not freeride. For this type of riding it works great. I weigh 185... if you weigh more you might want a stiffer compression coil. I've heard that the SPV may fail in the future... so far so good. Rebound knob snapped after 2 rides..... replaced under warranty but took 4 weeks.

Similar Products Used: Bombers
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Randy Cleary   [Apr 04, 2004]
Strength:

What a surprise. All that travel and no bob. I don't like fiddling and fine tuning stuff - I just want to get out and RIDE - but the adjustments on this are so easy to work with.

Weakness:

None yet.

Coming from the Scalpel - with it's minimal travel and lockouts front and rear which I use every ride - I was shocked (yeah, ha, ha) to find a plush 5" ride I could hammer on and not experience bob - and with no lockouts!
Another reviewer states he does get some bob when standing and I believe him but he weighs 270 lbs. At 200 lbs. I can even stand up and not lose power to the dreaded bob - so I imagine for the average rider at 150 to 180 this thing's a dream.
Paired with the swinger 3 way rear shock that also has the SPV tech - I've got a bike that is a totally different experience from the Scalpel without giving up too much in terms of quickness.
I really dislike techy mumbo jumbo that just seems an excuse to call this years model 'better than ever' - but this stable platform valve really works and is easy to fine tune to suit your riding - not just once, but fine tuning it to whatever type of riding you may be doing that day - easy!

Similar Products Used: my regular ride is a Scalpel w/head shock
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Isaac Silverman   Weekend Warrior [Apr 09, 2007]
Strength:

adjustability. reasonably light. plush enough for me. spv platform. looks.

Weakness:

poor rebound damping. durability. tracking only average. availability of replacement parts.

Affordable fork that performs well till it breaks. Then you are SOL.

I happily used this fork for two seasons of trail riding. Once I got the SPV dialed in I was quite pleased with it's performance. The SPV platform works and while it's not a freeride fork by any stretch of the imagination, it happily soaked up high speed rock gardens and smaller (3'-4') drops you'll find on technical Colorado trails. I didn't find the ride as "harsh" on the small stuff as some have complained. I typically ran it around 115-120 mm travel but I definitely enjoyed the ability to adjust this before prolonged climbs or descents. It never leaked oil or required service of any kind.

My only performance gripes were that the rebound was always a touch sluggish (even with damping all the way down) for my riding style and that the tracking through the rough stuff was only good, not excellent. Aside from those minor weaknesses it just quietly did it's job.

Until now. I was adjusting my rebound damping in the middle of the ride when the knob came off in my hand. The metal knob is attached to a plastic shaft which in turn interfaces with the damping chamber. The plastic shaft broke.

Now the fork is stuck in the fully damped mode. Let's just say it is so damp it's wet. It packs up horribly on descents and dives (with nasty results) in slower rocky technical sections.

The only way to remedy the situation is to replace the entire rebound damping chamber. Manitou/Answer/HB suspension products tells me that there is a roughly 1.5 month wait for this $60 part. My experience with factory service (to be fair this is not specific to Manitou products) is that you should probably double the amount of wait time they tell you. Add shipping and labor at a bike shop and we're looking at over two months and close to $100 in the best case scenario.

If it were just the expense of the repair I would be perfectly satisfied with my minute. Yeah, it shouldn't have cheap plastic internals, but it did last two years of solid use before breaking, and I spent several hundred less for the minute than a similarly featured Fox TALAS. That said, even if the promised 1.5 month waiting period is correct, it is far too long.

Unless I can quickly find the needed part from another source, I will be buying a new fork. Let's just say that I am leaning towards a Rock Shox Revelation or Fox Talas this time around.

Buy this if you are tight on cash and want an excuse to try out the newest fork on the market in a year or two. Don't buy it if you want a fork to last the life of your bike.

Similar Products Used: Fox TALAS
OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
Thom   Cross Country Rider [Apr 03, 2007]
Strength:

Feels good for the ride or two before it breaks

Weakness:

POS for reliability

I bought the bike with this fork in November, just in time for the worst season of weather we have had. So several months later, after only maybe half a dozen short easy rides, I hang up my bike and notice the air shock side is soaked in oil. I weigh 195 but the biggest air I have done is about a foot off the ground and a bunch of log rollovers.
This has got to be someones idea of a bad joke! Looking at the reviews, I am defnitely not alone. I had a Manitou fork before this one and it was surprisingly reliable. No more Manitous for ME! This works out to be a pretty high cost per ride for a "budget" fork that is now shot, if I read the other reviews correctly.

Similar Products Used: Bunches of lower travel forks on previous bikes
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Spongedog   Cross Country Rider [Jan 17, 2004]
Strength:

*Enables rider to take the nastiest lines with ease!
*Plenty of Travel
*SPV works!
*Great climber, even at 130mm

Weakness:

none so far

I wanted to match the Swinger 4 with a like-minded fork. I tried the Minute 1 and it won me over. It allows me to rocket down any hill, and easily climb back to the top, regardless of roots and rocks. I came from a SID SL and initially thought I would not be able to climb the really steep stuff at 130mm, but that is not the case. I tried the fork at 100mm a couple of times, but have not wound it down from 130mm since the first week I had the fork. In addition to the dirt, I enjoy riding urban in Washington DC. The SPV technology works very well when grinding out the miles on the street, and then just as easily lets me drop a few feet or take a big staircase. It is equally adept at allow you to pedal right back up the stairs.

If you have the funds, go for it!

Similar Products Used: Sid SL
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Clint   Cross Country Rider [Feb 01, 2004]
Strength:

Great all round fork. Nice fresh, smooth ride. 100-130 travel is easy to use and works well. Nice finish overall with alloy moving parts. Strong but light.

Weakness:

None

Got to say Manitou are getting better. Very Nice shocks this year including the minute. If you want a xc fork with more travel. look at this fork.

Similar Products Used: Rock Shox Psylo, Manitou Blacks, SID's
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Alan Kim   Cross Country Rider [Oct 20, 2005]

Manitou's reliability is terrible. The fork leaked at the rebound knob like everyone is saying. The fork has serious flex problems. If you have this kind of dough, do not hesitate and get a FOX, you will thank me later. It will last longer, has better tunability, more plush, less flex, and way more confidence. Forget MANIPOO, their customer service and product is horrible!

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Joshua Lesser   Cross Country Rider [Apr 15, 2004]
Strength:

Adjustable ride height, holds air without any lose of pressure since the day I bought it.

Weakness:

the first time I went to adjust the rate of rebound the knob fell off in to my hand. I call Answer the manufacture and they were blaming me. The guy said I broke it. Well yeah I technically did, because it was a piece of S@#t to begin with. The level of customer service from this company I got sucked so bad that I'm really sorry I bought anything from them.

This is an amazing bike but the review is not on the bike but on the fork. I really liked the fork up until last night and then I thought it was still good but after my call to the company today I hate them. I really hate bad customer service. There are so many other great products and companies out there I don't have to put up with this kind of S@#t. I'm going to rate the product low because it broke the first time I tried to adjust it and because they don't offer any sort of help. I hope somebody from the company reads this so they can make any internal fixes to the staff that need to happen.

Similar Products Used: Rock Shox Sid
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
2
Super Clyde   Weekend Warrior [Jan 07, 2004]
Strength:

A coil fork that works for me at 270lbs (with firm ride spring for additional $19), lightweight @ 4lbs, rapid wind down adjustable travel 100mm to 130mm and anywhere in between, SPV w/volume adjuster, rebound adjustable, BBQ black paint job is durable and matches my frame.

The terms "all-mountain", "enduro", "trailbike" and "aggressive XC" all can be used to catagorize the applications for this fork. This is also a coil spring fork that most Clydes can be happy with for it's intended uses.

The adjustments all can be felt and do make a difference in how the fork works. Be sure to fine tune it to suit you. The volume adjuster and the SPV air setting make especially big differences.

This is a great fork for a 4" to 6" FS trailbike

Weakness:

Visibly "flexy" compared to the Headshock it replaced, but no more so than any other 4lb s/c fork with 30mm stanchions. I would not put this fork on a true Freeride bike. I would look at the Sherman Firefly for a Freeride fork that will be used and abused on a regular basis.

I first rode the Minute One on a test ride for a week on a 2004 Giant VT1 that was a 90mm to 120mm model. I originally wanted to test the bike to compare the Swinger rear shock to my stock Vanilla coil shock. What surprised me was that the rear shock was not the major difference between the Giant Vt1 and my 99 Super V. It was the fork!

I rode it on trails that I was very familiar with and I was considerably faster going down than I ever had been. I found myself pedaling for speed in spots where I was usually feathering the brakes to scrub off speed with the old 80mm Headshock.

The crown to axle distance on the 80mm Headshock is about the same as the Minute One is at the 100mm setting. I was also considering the Vanilla 125, but wanted to be able to adjust the travel easily on the trail in case the fork was too tall to climb comfortably at the longest setting.

Another surprising thing about the Minute One was that it was a coil spring that could be adjusted to work for a heavy rider like myself (270lbs) with the stock spring. I have installed the Firm Ride spring ($19) recently so that I could back off on the volume adjuster and make the spring rate more linear. I could have lived with the stock spring if I had to. That's something I never thought I would say about a coil spring fork. The Firm spring works great now that I have backed off on the volume adjuster to 2 turns out instead of 4 like it was with the stock spring. If you get the Firm spring and are installing it yourself, make sure you take the smaller inner spring out of the stock spring and install it into the new spring. Just pop it past the end of the bigger spring and the reverse thread it out of the old one and into the new one. It's not hard to do yourself. I used a 28mm socket to carefully remove the cap.

The SPV works well to prevent "bob" while seated, but will not stop it if I'm out of the saddle hammering (which is rare for me anyway, so it is not an issue). The fork is pretty plush on the small stuff compared to my old air spring Headshock and although it can't possibly track as surely as the Headshock did in rough terrain, it is not problematic because the Minute just sucks up everything in it's path.

I used to need to pick my through some rough sections carefully in order to stay in control, but now I can look for the roughest path down on those same rough sections and just smile as I go whizzing down faster than I ever did before.

I can still climb well with the travel set at 130mm, but don't it's noticeably better at 100mm and it doesn't seem to affect the ride quality like the Black Comp does when the travel is adjusted on it.

The true bottom line: I was considering getting a new frame or new bike. I liked my Super V in stock form, but knew there were plusher setups out there. After testing the VT1, I felt a fork upgrade (along with a new 4-Way Swinger on order) would make my old rig new again and just the addition of the fork has put a big smile back on my mug. My old frame will now last me at least a few more years. It is truly like riding a new bike, it's that different and that much improved.

A few years ago, I would have given a Manitou a second glance. I was not impressed with their forks at all, but that seems to have changed. The Black Comp on my daughters Jekyll gave me a reason to consider Manitou, especially with the outstanding CS experience I received when I had an issue with the Black Comp. If the Minute One did not exist, I probably would have gone with a Fox Vanilla 125RLC or TALAS, possibly a Marzocchi (Marathon SL or MX w/ETA) or maybe something at the top of the Manitou Black series, but the Minute One seemed to suit my overall needs the best.

I am giving it 5/5 because it delivers what it says it will deliver (although for $549 it should stand the test of time as well and we'll have to see about that): Four pounds and 130 "all mountain travel adjustable" millimeters of well mannered front suspension. Well done.

Similar Products Used: RS Judy XC, RS Jett, RS Pilot, Headshock (80mm SL), Manitou Black Comp, Fox Vanilla RLC
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-10 of 34  

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