Shimano Tourney RD-TX75 Rear Derailleur

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Shimano Tourney RD-TX75 Rear Derailleur 

USER REVIEWS

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[Feb 15, 2013]
Charles Ramsey

Strength:

You must use a megarange derailer to climb 34 tooth cogs with 7 or fewer gears.

Weakness:

Mine failed and went into the spokes and yes I had a spoke protector. Shimano lower priced derailers come in two types with a derailer hanger and direct mount. Mine was direct mount. These have a plastic washer on the hanger bolt this washer has play and prevents index shifting. Mine was worn and contributed to the play that allowed the derailer into the spokes. The derailer hanger models do not have this washer and have less play. There was also excess play in the pivot bolt I notices this when I installed the derailer and tried to tighten it it turns out the Torx bolt is fake. After the failure the pivot bolt was loose where it joins the cage this was probably the play I noticed when I installed the derailer. This joint worked loose under normal wear and contributed the the play that allowed the cage into the spokes. It also turned out the cable pully that does not exist on the TX 35 was frozen after less than a year use. The pully is not needed and is difficult to thread with out fraying the cable. Most Shimano derailers will not climb a 34 tooth cog with 7 or fewer gears you have to use a megarange derailer to climb these. Older Shimano derailers such as the TY 18 will work on cogs bigger than 34 and have a greater chain capacity than the TX series.

Don't buy the TX series. If you have a direct mount model remove the plastic spacer and insert a steel one axle spacers will work this eliminates the play. Do not buy Shimano or Sram index shifter to use with these derailers.

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