SRAM Powerglide PG-970 9SP Cassette

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Powerglide PG-970 9SP

The latest inThe wallet-friendly 970 line from SRAM delivers great shifting at a wallet-friendly price.They fitShimano/SRAM 8/9/10 compatible freehub bodies (thats virtually every cassette hub in production) and offer excellent reliability and lifespan. claimed 330 grams (11-32T); 340 grams (11-34 version) includes lockring 9 speed

User Reviews (7)

Showing 1-7 of 7  
FireStu   [May 23, 2012]
Strength:

Durable, shifts well, cheep on offer at £22 cant complain.

Weakness:

Bit heavy, and it wore out but that's my fault for not chaining the chain sooner.

Really good cassette, shifts really smoothly and was very good value, just bought a second one so no complaints!

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Available At:
Dude   Cross Country Rider [May 29, 2011]
Strength:

Durable,shifts well.
Good value.

Weakness:

None

The PG 780 weighs 310gms, the PG 770 weighs 330gms, the difference is 3/4 of an ounce, that's a very expensive ounce if you want to get the 780 and pretty rediculous of the reviewer below to make such a big deal of it.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
rmillet   Weekend Warrior [Feb 09, 2011]
Strength:

Solid Product, smooth shifting.

Weakness:

None Identified.

I got 1300 ot 1500 miles or so out of this (1.5 years), primarily riding on the 13-15-17t rings. Chain growth of 1/2 link caused gear wear over time. Only last 150 miles or so, detectable shift problems that I couldn't tune out (wanting to jump under load); when new shifts GREAT even under hard load. Nice solid gear set, would probably still be good if I'd monitor my chain better.

I just put on another one of these, I have no reason to change brands etc., I like.

Similar Products Used: Shimano 8 & 9 speeds
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Available At:
Ecogeek   Downhiller [Sep 10, 2010]
Strength:

Strong

Weakness:

Heavy

For any bike that climbs a lot, get the PG-980 instead.
For any bike that doesn't this is perfect.
It's almost that simple.
Well, if the prices are the same or v close, get the 980 - obviously.
No probs w either cassette. But the 970 is quite a bit heavier for a minor saving (if you shop around on the 980).

To elaborate for those that want to read it. I have a bunch of 980s and a load of Shimano. The 980 is best performance/value overall IMO. BUT it's not the cheapest, and it is identical in performance to the 970 in every way except weight.
The 990 saves a tiny amount more weight over the 980 for a lot more cash. The 980 is the sweet spot in terms of performance/value for climbers that aren't racing. The 970 is the sweet spot in performance/value for flat and downhill.
Both cassettes work great w x0. x9. x7 front or rear DLs long or med cage* and shifters and SRAM chains. They both work fine w double and triple cranks. Both 11-32 and 11-34 are fine choices for an MTB that encounters genuinely steep climbs.
*Medium cage rear DL is for double (or single speed) cranks only unless you run a narrow range in your chainrings and/or cassette.
I generally use 22-36-bash crankset + pg-980 11-32 on the lighter more uphill/epic bike w long cage X.0 rear DL and 175mm cranks for leverage.
And 24-36-bash crankset + pg-980 11-34 on the heavier AM bike w med cage x.9 rear DL and 170mm cranks.
I get about the same ratios at a greater weight which sounds stupid, but the shorter cranks and DL cage make up for it a bit and give me more rock/log clearance. I can spin the shorter cranks faster and hit them on fewer obstacles.
I'm 5'10" btw.

The pg-970 is on a heavy duty wheelset for taking to resorts/parks where climbing is irrelevant. I have used it for general riding and it's fine. Just heavier and as I have the 980s, I don't want to carry that weight uphill when I don't need to.
I'll give it 4 for value as I think the 980 is better value for climbers and is as good for descenders.
4 overall - again just cos the 980 is a little better in some situations.
Basically, anything the 970 can do, the 980 can do as well or better. The 970 can do anything as well as the 980 can do it - except climb. So, if climbing is on the cards and you have the cash, your choice is made. If you only want to go downhill, or live somewhere like the UK where there really are not many 'major' climbs, then it's up to whether you think you can better spend the money you save or not.
Something else to consider. If you never climb stuff that's v steep, then not only do you not need the 980, but you can also get away with a narrower range cassette. The smaller cogs weigh less whichever model you buy. Just give yourself at least 28t at the back just in case. W a 22t granny at the front this will get you up most stuff.
The lamest weight-weenie thing I've seen is someone using a road-bike cassette on their MTB to save weight and then having to push their almost $10k machine up steep or long climbs. Pathetic. Function first and foremost.

Similar Products Used: PG-980, Shimano XT.
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
johnhugo71   Cross Country Rider [Mar 01, 2010]
Strength:

shifts clean, durable, fairly stiff

Weakness:

nothing really, it wore out but that's normal.

The cassette held up well, i'm a big clyde who mashes on gears and doesn't always shift the smoothest and this thing has held up to 2 seasons and over 2,000 miles of trail riding. pretty stinkin good in my book. is it the best out there? no, but is it pretty good for the price point? yep. i'm actually going to put one on my spare wheelset. i like that sram is a u.s. company (i know it's not made here but at least the profits stay here) i'll give it both 4 chili's, nothing is perfect but this is pretty good for the value.

Similar Products Used: shimano, and sram products
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Available At:
njoehawkeye   Cross Country Rider [Apr 06, 2009]
Strength:

Long wear, shifts smooth, great range.

Weakness:

Maybe a little heavier than the high enders.

This Cassette came stock on my bike, with a Shimano 9spd chain. (Kind of a weird spec in m y opinion), but it seems to be holding up well considering the dusty, rocky, sandblasty conditions we usually ride in on the Front Range. I'm also pretty particular about keeping the drivetrain spotless. Also haven't reached 0.075% wear on the chain, so I'll repost.

Similar Products Used: Shimano xt.
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
mojavehanna   Cross Country Rider [Jan 27, 2009]
Strength:

Good looking, smooth shifting, fairly light.

Weakness:

none so far

Is this the best cog you can get? No. But it is inexpensive and works good for the price. I have no problems with the cog so far, it shifts good and does what it's supposed to do. I dont know what else to say, it's a cog. If you need a decent medium-end replacement cog this one should work out good for you unless your riding a couple of hundred miles a week.

Similar Products Used: Shimano
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-7 of 7  
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