American Classic Ti Seatpost Seatpost

American Classic Ti Seatpost Seatpost 

DESCRIPTION

  • 350 x 27.2mm
  • Polished Titanium

  • USER REVIEWS

    Showing 1-10 of 37  
    [May 08, 2008]
    Jeff
    Cross Country Rider

    Strength:

    Lack of mass..Perfect amount of flex, easy to clean up, clamp system works just fine..

    Weakness:

    None so far.

    This post is just what the procdoc ordered. Yep it does flex. The ride is sublime, I dont feel any side to side flex when I hammer while seated, it matches the ride of the Sette carbon bars perfectly. The monkey had a nice ride to begin with, but the raceface evolve I had on was too stiff. I considered finding an old rockshox suspension post, which I also like, but wanted to go lighter. This one does it for sure. The clamp system is just like my wifes AC post so I knew what I was getting into, just take your time setting it up (really, its not that complicated)... My Monkey really feels like my Merlin Echo soft tail now, even smoother.. Oh and for clean-up find the BlueMagic metal polish, the best thing for titanium or aluminum..

    Similar Products Used:

    No other titanium posts, many aluminum, carbon.

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    [Sep 29, 2001]
    scott northwood
    Cross Country Rider

    Strength:

    Light weight.

    Weakness:

    The main problem with this seatpost is the clamp, as noted by others the clamp creaks and will break with hard use,when riding in Moab the bolt broke. I definitely would not recommed this seat post to anyone using it on a mountain bike or heavier rider.

    Look for a seat post with a better clamp design.

    OVERALL
    RATING
    1
    VALUE
    RATING
    2
    [Oct 18, 2001]
    Chuck S
    Cross Country Rider

    Strength:

    nice ride, finish, easy to assemble

    Weakness:

    WON"T STAY TIGHT!

    This is a part you should never have to think about - like a stem. Well, this baby won't stay tight - I'm 150lbs. and not radical in ANY sense. So I can't forget about this thing, which is not a good property for a seat post. I came on to see if anyone has a fix - I'm going to take it apart, and reassemble with heavy duty locktight. If it comes loose again, out it goes, and I'll be back to give it a "one".
    As it is, it looks good, rides well - I'll give it a three.

    OVERALL
    RATING
    3
    VALUE
    RATING
    3
    [Mar 31, 1998]
    Jeffrey B.
    cross-country rider

    Doesn't function as supposed to- the first time I rode it, the head got loose, the second time, it loosened again- the 100th, saddle slides back. And the 27.2 didn't fit in my Merlin Mtn- I had to wiggle, jam, gouge that thing in- it sucks, but is light-This thing shouldn't even budge- it's supposed to be a set it and forget it rigid part!

    OVERALL
    RATING
    2
    VALUE
    RATING
    [Mar 08, 2001]
    Ben
    Racer

    Strength:

    shiney and purdee, cheap, light!

    Weakness:

    nada

    best dern seatpost out there for under 40 bucks. why pay more for someting that came out last year and doesn't have half the r&d to back it up. american classic's been making these forever (since at lease the early 80s, probably longer) and they're great. i once had the fixing bold strip through the threads on the craddle plate and sent AC an email letting them know what happened. 3 days later i had my new cradle plate for free and some stickers to boot.

    super light, super shiney, and very durable (considering the weight). other aluminum posts costs 2-3 times as much, don't look half as nice, and have about 1/5 the heritage.

    get one!

    Similar Products Used:

    ultegra aero, campy aero

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    [Dec 09, 2000]
    Elvis Karate
    Cross Country Rider

    Strength:

    Is still around years later

    Weakness:

    Design. Tall top clamp, weak bolts

    I bought a new bike recently and it uses 26.8 seatpost. I had this AC ti in a tool box. It still had the can cooler foam I had zip tied to the top of the clamp from the last time I used it. Using a TI rail saddle with some flex caused my 195 LB but to crush the saddle into contact with the post cause a hard spot. I thought this time I will use a Cromo Saddle and see if that helped. Then I realized the hollow bolt at the back of the saddle was cracked. As luck would have it I had an old road post laying around and was able to use the bolt from that. First ride and the to tall top clap still contacts the top of the saddle. How did I solve this... with my new Race Face seatpost.

    Similar Products Used:

    Salsa, Thomson, Race Face, Ritchey, Shimano, IRD

    OVERALL
    RATING
    2
    VALUE
    RATING
    3
    [Aug 12, 2000]
    Craig
    Cross Country Rider

    Strength:

    Compliant ride

    Weakness:

    -Price
    -Clamp/bolt design (creaky & doesn't hold saddle in place firmly)
    -Top portion of clamp is only 1/2" wide...not nearly wide enough to hold the saddle firmly

    The good thing first...the titanium AC post gives a nice, compliant ride (exactly what I was looking for). The clamp design, however, is TERRIBLE. In order to eliminate the incessant creaking, I tightened the bolt too much and stripped out the top part of the clamp. I got a new one from AC, but the post continued to creak. After consulting with my local bike shop a few times, trying various things (greasing seat rails, wrapping electrical tape around seat rails, using teflon tape on the clamp bolt, etc.), the post still creaked AND the saddle wouldn't stay in place...it kept sliding backward. Due to the fact that the clamp bolt threads into an aluminum upper clamp (weight savings attempt), you cannot tighten it very much. I sent the saddle back to my bike shop for a refund. This $140 post is junk.

    I have used a Moots Laidback Ti post briefly in the past and the ride was very compliant as well. I may switch back to this post, but Moots posts generally tend to be on the small side as far as sizing goes. I spoke with someone at Moots about the post I used, and they said that the one I had measured on the small end of the tolerance spectrum. What did this mean to me? My 27.2mm Moots post was actually smaller than all the other 27.2mm posts I've used, and I couldn't keep the seatpost from slipping a little as I rode. I think I'll try to get a new Moots post out of a fresh (and hopefully slightly larger diameter) production run. Don't waste your money on the AC post (or the Litespeed ti post, which looks like a re-badged AC).

    Similar Products Used:

    RaceFace XY, Moots Laidback Ti

    OVERALL
    RATING
    2
    VALUE
    RATING
    1
    [Jul 30, 2000]
    Dave
    Cross Country Rider

    Strength:

    Lo weight (trimmed to 134g) Lo price/on sale for under $20. Easy adjust/infinite adjust/positive adjust.Common fasteners:using SRP Ti fix & adjust screws. Strong: carrying 242# rider for 6 yrs + 2 yrs previous bike w/AmClsc same model post.

    Weakness:

    none

    Lighter than Ti or C @ 1/6 cost. (Check for blowouts on American Classics own website) Only viable 1-bolt infinite adjust using non-proprietary/orphan/oddball fasteners.

    Similar Products Used:

    Kalloy OEM last 2 bikes - both replaced w/in month w/AmClsc

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    [Mar 19, 2000]
    Daniel Boscacci
    Racer

    Strength:

    Lightweight

    Weakness:

    Poor materials, no durability

    I've had three of these posts. The first one scracthed way too easily, the finish tarnished too fast. The second one somehow malformed and now doesn't slide easily anymore. The third one had a frozen clamp which hindered the horizontal adjustment. For $36-$40 it is moderately priced, but should have better quality coming from such a fine company. Save your money and go for something that lasts.

    Similar Products Used:

    Shimano, IRD, Ringle

    OVERALL
    RATING
    1
    VALUE
    RATING
    1
    [Oct 22, 1999]
    Richard
    Racer

    Strength:

    Strength, simplicity, ultimate adjustablility and just good engineering.

    Weakness:

    None!

    I got the Am.Classic alumunum post with my used Schwinn. I got it from the locale's hot racer... 190lb., only knew how to hammer, bent/crushed a pedal, toasted elastomers, but nothing to the seat post. I had already had trouble with a couple...all with splines. If poorly tightened, and unless splines are clean, sharp and not galled, it's easy to get them off. Once they slip over one another, the mount is toast. I got sick and tired of remaking splines with a jeweler's file, just to have something to ride. I have a bullet proof Control on one bike, but it weighs 3/4lb., and changing or adjusting the seat requires fingers like plastic man.
    My American Classic has had innumerable miles, hours, races and crashes with just myself and the original owner. If that's not enough, as it's now my second bike, every guest gets to bounce it down the trails, including a 200lb. lawyer...8 years without a hitch. Occam's Law says that the simplest explanation is usually the best, and this particularly applies to engineering. The American Classic seat post clamp has no bells or whistles, one bolt to tighten it, and with one small bolt to adjust it, is infinitely adjustable. No splines to strip and gall,, no splines to keep you all day adjusting...trying to get it to stay in just the right spot. This is simply a good design. Those who've stripped bolts have almost certainly done something wrong. Moistened aluminum with steel or Ti bolts will gall...galling removes metal and severely weakens threads. Never-sieze is a must for these threads. Also, some people think that if good and tight is is working, even tighter, still is better. There are specific parameters that need to be adhered to when tightening anything like fork crowns and seat posts...proper lubrication and proper tension are absolutes...especially considering the prices and your safety!

    Similar Products Used:

    Zoom, Control, Uno, Shimano, USE.

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    Showing 1-10 of 37  

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