Titus RX 1 XC Full Suspension

Titus RX 1 XC Full Suspension 

DESCRIPTION

  • 6061 aluminum front triangle with triple butted
  • Four sealed-bearing main pivot
  • Hydro-formed chainstay
  • Compression molded, multi-direction carbon fiber X-Link
  • Size specific tubing

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-2 of 2  
[Oct 13, 2010]
straycatkid
Weekend Warrior

Strength:

Very lightweight, all components working flawlessly, very fast great-looking bike

Weakness:

None so far

This bike has been brilliant. It is actually my first full-suspension and I really lucked out finding it at such a great price. An '08 model that was sitting around the shop and they needed it gone.

It's comfortable, flies down hardpack, handles great, climbs great - I feel it climbs better than my old hardtail. The Fox RP2 is a nice shock, it doesn't lock out fully but I don't find that to be a hindrance.

I'm lovin' it.

Similar Products Used:

Previous ride was a 2000 Spec Hardrock. This was a big upgrade.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
[Sep 09, 2009]
older'nslower
Cross Country Rider

Strength:

Fairly inexpensive for a half-way decent frame.

Weakness:

The rear shock.

I ordered the frame from Jenson USA and it appears that the Manitou shock with which it is shipped may be a little short to get the advertised 100mm of travel. It supposedly has the same travel and geometry as the lighter Racer-X, but the shock on this bike is only 190mm eye to eye, whereas the Racer-X is spec'd with a 200mm shock (Titus website). I dunno - maybe the RX1 has a longer chain stay or something. Anyhow, I let all the air out of it and kept the valve depressed and was only able to get the shock to compress about 40 mm. It appeared that if the shock was to go to 50mm, that the seat stay brace might contact the seat tube. Is less than 50mm of shock travel enough for 100mm of travel at the rear wheel on this bike? If so, why are the Racer-Xs spec'd with the 200mm X 50mm shock? (Jenson was willing to take the frame back, but I elected to keep it. My experiences with them have always been extremely positive. I can definitely recommend them as an online retailer.)

I called Titus and the guy with whom I spoke didn't know much about the RX1, but didn't see why it would not get the advertised travel. (I did notice other online retailers are selling the complete bike with a Fox RP2. Maybe it's a 200mm X 50 model.)

Travel issues aside though, shorter shock length will cause the bottom bracket to sit lower to the ground. The geometry specs call for this bike to have a 12.7" BB, but my measurement says somewhere between 12" and 12.25" (2.1 tire on back, 2.3 on front). This measurement would be consistent with a shorter shock. When riding it, I definitely have to gauge my pedaling to avoid strikes against every little root and rock in the trail.

To solve the problem, I went ahead and ordered 200 X 50 Manitou Swinger to replace the short Radium on the bike ($100 from Cambria). I will admit, that even with the short shock, and having to be careful with the pedal strokes, that the bike rides amazingly. I could not believe that I was clearing sections that would stop me on my previous bike and I felt like I was hardly working to do it on the Titus. Surprisingly as well, the rear suspension felt fairly supple for casual trail riding. It ought to be totally sweet with a longer shock.

So bottom line is that the frame is still a good buy, but be aware that if you get the one with the 190mm Manitou shock, the shock may have to be replaced if you want the bike to have the claimed travel and geometry.

BTW, I'm using this as a XC trail bike. I'm about 5'10" and the large size fit me well for this application. I can put a short stem on it and the longer wheelbase seems to calm down any tendency to be twitchy on the descents. Racers will probably want one of the lighter Titus models.

Similar Products Used:

GT LTS, KHS FS XC

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Showing 1-2 of 2  

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