Park Tool TS-2 Professional Truing Stand Tools

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TS-2 Professional Truing Stand

Park Tool TS-2.2 Professional Wheel Truing Stand: The world?s most popular wheel truing stand and the standard of the industry for 35 years is now, more than ever, the stand to choose for daily shop use. The new TS-2.2 combines time-tested

User Reviews (20)

Showing 1-10 of 20  
Eric   Cross Country Rider [Nov 27, 2001]
Strength:

This is a tried and true piece of shop equipment

Weakness:

Takes an ounce of brains to get set up correctly

There is nothing wrong with this truing stand. 99% of the shops in the world use this stand. The other 1% probably do and don't tell anyone. Everyone who needs a dishing tool with this stand just needs the stand aligned correctly. If you still can't get it together, you can just turn the wheel around. When you get it centered so that it is in the same spot, there you are. The bottom line, anyone who bags on this stand, shouldn't work on bikes!

Similar Products Used: I'm a bike mechanic..try to find a shop that has something else.
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Available At:
Ryan   [Feb 02, 2006]
Strength:

Quality constuction; easy to use; gives you all the adjustments and references to build high quality wheels, nothing more, nothing less; mounts easily into a benchvise or bolts directly to a work bench; when properly adjusted, give an accurate measure of wheel dish; reference arms are wide enough to accomadate fat downhill MTB tires.

Weakness:

Was not properly aligned for wheel dish when I recieved it (instructions claim that this is done at the factory); out of the box, requires either a base sold separately by Park, or must be clamped in a bench vise or bolted to a bench (will not stand up on its own); 20mm axeled wheels require either an adapter or some measure of creativity to mount in the stand.

I've actually used this particular stand in one variation or another for a few years while working at a few different shops. I've always found it plenty accurate and all that you really need for building and truing wheels. Radial and lateral truing, as well as dishing can be done accurately with this stand (provided it is adjusted properly).

When I first recieved my own stand, I was a little disappointed that the dishing was way off, especially since I needed to dish one of my boutique wheel sets (wasn't dished correctly at the factory, grrr.). I used one of the reference arms to dish the wheel by flipping it over in the stand and matching the gaps on each side. Once the wheel was dished, I used it to center the stand. Centering the stand is pretty straight-forward; the two locknuts that stabalize the dropout arms with the reference arms have to be loosened to shift the dropout arms for rough adjustment. The reference arms can then be shifted side to side for final fine adjustment. Took about 15 minutes to figure it out and get it adjusted to my liking.

This is probably the first stand that I have ever used that has actually been properly adjusted for dish. All the ones I've used at shops have had the dishing alignment messed up one way or another, and no one bothered to take the time to realign them. I've found dishing to be much easier in the stand than using a separate dishing tool.

The simplicity and durability further shows that working on or building wheels isn't rocket science and requires a tool that simply gives you a repeatable set of reference points and the durability to last years on end. Park hasn't changed this stand much over the last decade or so, and they shouldn't. For as long as wheels are built with separate rims, hubs and spokes, this, a spoke wrench and maybe a tensiometer are all you'll ever need. 5 stars overall and for value; though not the cheapest of stands out there, the test of time in numerous shops is all I need to justify the cost. I would highly recommend this to anyone who wants to get into wheel building over any of the cheaper consumer stands from Perforance or Nashbar (well, even Park makes a cheap consumer stand, forget that one too).

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Lester Browne   Cross Country Rider [Oct 29, 2001]
Strength:

Sturdy... takes wheel with or without tires... trues round, and lateral... adjustable (with optional base)... quickly adjustable... takes many different types of wheels.

Weakness:

Ummm...

I've built some nice, laser sharp wheels with this stand and trued machine built wheels to near perfection. It wasn't mine but in a shop i worked at that saw heavy use of all four of these stands (well before I started working there) and never had one fail. It may work lose after a few years, but if that's the only thing that goes wrong then no complaining here. Bolt it to the end of a bench or sturdy surface and it's good to go. Not a finely machined peice of art, but if you know what you're doing, then it'll get the job done just fine. Nor is it a do-it-all-wunder-wheel-machine; used in combination with a decent dishing tool and spoke tensionometer ($$$), some long-lasting wheels will result.

And to the fellow below: learn how to true a wheel and use a dishing tool and you might have better luck with your stand. And good luck using your rubber, flakey, rounded out brake pads to true your wheels -- i'm sure your wheels will end up perfect.

Similar Products Used: n/a
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Available At:
Tim   [Dec 11, 2007]
Strength:

sturdy, reliable, easy to use.

Weakness:

None noted

If you're building wheels, or have a lot of bikes and are hard on wheels, a truing stand is almost a necessity. Once you learn how to true a wheel, the stand will pay for itself in a year or less. You'll be popular with your riding buddies too. The only thing your friends will appreciate more is if you brew your own beer.

I don't understand the point of suggesting the fact it needs to be mounted as a product weakness. It's simple, buy the mount built by Park, mount it to a bench, or build a portable mount of your own design. I don't see it as a product weakness, only a hindrance to users who need instructions to walk and chew gum at the same time.


I read a lot of complaints on previous reviews about alignment problems. Most of them seem to arise when the wheel has been removed and turned around and the reviewer finds the dish is no longer what they thought it was. Here's a secret tip for you guys. Mark the axle with a silver sharpie so it goes back in oriented the same way. If the axle is even slightly bent, and this is VERY common, it will change the position of the rim in relation to the uprights of the stand when installed in a different position. If the axle is bent, and you don't put it in the way it was, it's not going to line up, I guarantee it.

As professional mechanic, and a fan of Park Tools, I highly recommend the park TS-2 truing stand

Similar Products Used: N/A
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
JRC3   Cross Country Rider [Dec 31, 2001]
Strength:

Industry standard, heavy duty construction, smooth operation. Allows precise adjustment of wheel once proper set-up is obtained.

Weakness:

Needs some kind of base or permanent mounting for stability, repeatable set-up is not "automatic"

I have to agree with the reviewers here who have had dificulty with the automatic centering feature of this stand. Even if the stand is checked and adjusted to be on center as per the included instructions, every time you put a wheel in (even the same wheel, the same way around) it goes in different. When I first tried the stand, I put my front wheel in and trued it up sweet. To check the dish (and the set-up of the stand) I flipped it around, and it was off-center by 2-3mm. When I flipped it back, it was off again (different from the first time). I ended up buying a dishing tool (Park WAG-1) and adopting the following strategy:1)Use a perfectly dished wheel or the Park tool and the truing stand instruction sheet to make sure the stand is set up properly. 2)Use a dishing tool to check the wheel you are working on, and adjust it for proper dish BEFORE PUTTING IT IN THE TRUING STAND.3)Place the wheel in the truing stand and gently snug up the forks, as per the instructions. 4)Spin the wheel and tighten up the calipers to see if the rim is centered in the stand. If it is not, I have found that tightening or loosening the clamping pressure on the locknuts will move the rim right or left. Play with the adjusting knob until the rim is centered in the calipers. 5)True the wheel! It seems like a lot of fuss for a precision tool, but it really has to do with getting to know the stand, your wheels, and how they interact. Once you get your own system down, this stand allows you to really dial in your wheels.

Similar Products Used: The old "brake pads" system.
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Available At:
Kevin   Cross Country Rider [Feb 03, 2004]
Strength:

ease of use, good centering gages, sturdy

Weakness:

alignment problem others have reported can be solved by rotating the axels unit they are approx centred and then maarking with a whiteboard marker so that when you unwind the wheel and put it back it goes in exactly as before.
Most axels aren't the same all way round and wham the alignment goes out. when you rotate and mark it's the same each time you use it.
But you should use a dishing gauge also to be sure

Great price stand, highly reccomended if you ride often and your friends will love you.
Do yourself a favour and use the park tensiometer for best results.
Lazer sharp wheels that last will be the result.
And also learning to build them helps....

Similar Products Used: brake blocks, shop truing stand, TS-2 and TS-3 (yummy)
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Alex Marquis   [Aug 04, 2001]
Strength:

It would seem like a good concept. Too bad the machining tolerances are totally sloppy.
Maybe some lucky folks get one that happens to be accurate.

Weakness:

The wheel rim is always off center (to the right). So I can't use it without a dishing tool.
What is the point of owning this tool if it can't both true and dish wheels?
Also heavy. Heavy does not make it accurate. It just makes it heavy. I'm not trying to true motorcycles wheels.
I'm sending mine back.

What is the point of this expensive tool?
You could just as easily true against your brake pads or buy a cheap truing stand and a dishing tool. If you need perfect wheels (I do) you cannot get by with a TS-2.

This peice of junk is a waste of $ and metal.

Similar Products Used: Trueing based on brake pads.
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Available At:
Mark D   cross-country rider [Jul 17, 1997]

I have to agree 100% with Rod Hoadley about the stand not being centered. Once you put the wheel on the stand and get it tight you have to move the rim to get it in the middle. Other than that I would have to say that there is nothing wrong with the stand.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
Jeff   Cross-Country Rider [May 03, 1999]
Strength:

Easy to use. Almost fool-proof in set-up and operation.

Weakness:

Need to attach it to a sturdy base or work bench.

A great tool. If you're tired of going to the shop to get your wheels trued, buy this. It's the cost of a mail-order LX wheelset, but if you own this stand you'll double the life of your wheels.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
Available At:
Richard May   cross-country rider [Jan 13, 1997]

The local bike shop has let me use theirs and it is great. It is very easy to use and my wheel came out straight as an arrow.My only complaint is the high price, or I would have one in a second.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
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