Park Tool Consumer Truing Stand TS-7 Tools

Park Tool Consumer Truing Stand TS-7 Tools 

DESCRIPTION

Park Consumer Truing Stand TS-7

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-10 of 10  
[Oct 27, 2012]
Mike Schwartz

Strength:

It is a Park tool, so the general quality is good. I have had mine for many years now.

Weakness:

The sliding gauge/guide is the deal breaker. It is pretty much impossible to position the gauge/guide for fine adjustments. I am looking for a method or product to retrofit the stand with a threaded gide that will allow small movements in the gide.

Overall, I have seen less expensive truing stands that are easier to use. The real shortcoming is moving the gauge/guide.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
2
[Jul 04, 2012]
Ed

Strength:

Solidly built and easy to use.

Weakness:

I wouldn't mind a screw adjustment, but the sliding gauge is good enough.

I bought my TS7 used for $25. The best $25 I ever spent. This thing is rock solid and easy to use. I have trued at least a hundred wheels using this tool and have never seen the need to anchor it to anything. I true my wheels at the kitchen table with a white piece of paper and a good light. Centering the wheels between stays is easy, just flip the wheel every once in a while. Once you get the hang of it moving the sliding gauge is pretty simple. I can usually true a wheel in five or ten minutes. Sure makes it nice when you adjust the brakes on trued wheels.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Aug 08, 1999]
Michael J. Ritter
Cross-Country Rider

Strength:

Comes with dishing gauge

Weakness:

Truing gauge is only on one side. Also, the truing gauge must be manually moved in and out, which is significantly harder to control than if it was mounted on a screw. The truing stand has to be assembled and for all its weight, it will not stand on its own (i.e., has to mounted to something).

Forget my previous review, this product is far inferior to other products that are in the same price range. After using the Park TS-7 for $55, I bought the Performance Spin Doctor truing stand for $39.99 from www.performancebike.com (note, does not include dishing gauge) and it is so much better than Park's TS-7 that it is ridiculous (for your reference the TS-7 includes the $18 dishing gauge so the prices are almost identical for the stands). In short, the Performance Spin Doctor truing stand remedies all the weaknesses of the TS-7. For example, it has truing gauges on all three sides of the rim, the truing gauges are mounted on screws, the stand will stand on its own, and requires no assembly. Additionally, you can true a wheel at least three times faster than on the TS-7. I apologize for my earlier review, I just didn't know you could get the feature of a great truing stand for the same price as the TS-7.

Similar Products Used:

Performance Spin Doctor truing stand

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
[Jul 13, 1999]
Michael J. Ritter
Cross-Country Rider

Strength:

Very solid and inexpensive.

Weakness:

Although there is a rim gauge on only one side, I didn't find that to be too much of a problem. However, I agree with the post below that they should have mounted it so that a screw moves it back and forth.

This is an almost perfect truing stand for the home mechanic. In my view, the dishing gauge is a must for any truing stand (maybe I am old fashioned but I don't trust automatic centering devices) and it is included. Park, if you are listening, please mount the rim gauge with a screw for adjusting and you can get five chilis.

Similar Products Used:

None.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
[Mar 30, 1999]
N. Dough
Cross-Country Rider

Strength:

Inexpensive and solidly built. Comes with dishing gauge.

Weakness:

One-sided feeler/indicator arm.

This is a completely functional and servicable truing stand for those home mechanics who only trues wheels occasionally. The stand is stable, can be clamped or bolted to a bench and performs all of the same basic functions of the $170 professional truing stand. It does not auto center and does not have a tilting base (although I built one) but it's all I need to maintain three sets of wheels.

Similar Products Used:

None

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
[Jul 11, 1998]
Sherman
weekend warrior

This stand is great for the consumer. It is solid and it mounts on a bench if needed. It is also great because it comes with the dishing guage. I have rebuilt wheels on this stand and I love it. The only bad thing is the needle or the part you place against the rim. It would have been better if it was a screw instead of a piece of metal mounted on an adjustable spot. I find that if it was a screw it would help true the wheel better. But other than that it is great.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
[Aug 20, 2001]
joe

Strength:

Beefy base and arms
Included dishing unit is super beefy for the job it does.

Weakness:

wimpy, weak bolts used for assembly, I broke one of the included 1/4" carriage bolts with only about 2 lbs/ft of torque.
The adjustment of the truing gauge is difficult and jerky.
Takes a long time to true a wheel.

I don't understand why some components (base, uprights and wheel dishing tool) are so heavy and beefy (3/16 and 1/4 steel), yet all the bolts are substandard and the sliding surfaces and adjustable truing portions are cheap, crappy, sticky plastic and flimsy metal. Will get the job done, but investigate other choices.

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
2
[Jan 20, 2003]
Steve
Weekend Warrior

Strength:

Stiff and repeatible

Weakness:

Needs to be bolted down

I bought a performance/minoura stand, but took it back - it was just too flimsy for serious wheel building or truing. Once bolted down, or bolted to some slats, the Park stand is a rock. I'm not sure why they bother to include a dishing tool. The stand is so solid and repeatable that I find it's much quicker and easier to just keep flipping the wheel back and forth to keep the rim on center. This is just a great tool. I haven't run across anything that compares. I made some slats with wingnuts that I bolt the stand to. That way it comes apart quickly and stores easily.

Similar Products Used:

Performance/Minoura

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jan 20, 2005]
JackAlope
Cross Country Rider

Strength:

Beefy, includes dishing tool. Thats it.

Weakness:

Hard to true, hard to set to the right clearance for the hub, pain to do also. You can only true 1 side at a time, plastic components do not compliment beefy steel frame.

I suppose if you dont build much its okay, i would go for a stand that can true both sides. It includes a dishing guage, thats nice of them. Basically its price does not justify its pain in the assness that comes along for the ride.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
[Jul 12, 2002]
SGT. ROCK
Racer

Strength:

Strong construction
Comes with dish tool

Weakness:

Tippy unless clamped down
Some plastic parts

The frame of this stand will last forever. Some of the fittings are of questionable quality - stamped steel parts of insufficient strength - OK if you're careful.

If you can't build wheels fast with this thing, it's because you can't build wheels fast, period. It's your skill level that's limiting you, not this stand. I've built half a dozen wheels on this stand, and it works.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
3
Showing 1-10 of 10  

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