HomeMade 55 watt halogen light Older Lights

4/5 (11 Reviews)
MSRP : $80.00


Product Description

HomeMade 55 watt halogen light


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Reviews 1 - 11 (11 Reviews Total)

User Reviews

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Iain a Weekend Warrior from Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Date Reviewed: September 14, 2003

Strengths:    Inexpensive, separate parts easliy replaceable, since you made it yourself - you know how to fix it, pride in a job well done, good lights, cheap bulbs.

Weaknesses:    4.5 amphour SLA battery weighs a bit more than a NiCad or NiMh (still, i could easily loose a few pounds around the midriff), doesn't look swanky along side more expensive lights (who gives a sh*t)

Bottom Line:   
If you are looking for a good housing for bulbs (so you get that professional look) go to an auto-mart and buy a pair of the smallest plastic housing spotlights. Replace the 50 watt bulb with a 20 watter (unless you want to lug a bigger battery / do shorter rides)Buy a switch of your choice and connect it to the light housing or handlebars. Could even put one of those 3 step dimmers in line if you want (run it low on long rides when able to to conserve battery)

Good idea to solder all joints (otherwise you WILL experience a black out)

Bottom line is - bloody good lights for the price. Easy to build. Ideal for the as yet unconverted night rider (lets you get a taste without spending a fortune)

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   all of them

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Price Paid:    $30.00

Similar Products Used:   BLT (excellent - see review), Vista-Lights (no so excellent, see review), mates home made jobs

Bike Setup:   Jekyll 800 (with a few choice upgrades)

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by John a Downhiller from San Antonio, Tx

Date Reviewed: August 26, 2003

Strengths:    Unbreakable. Maglite-like reliability. Made from easily located parts and spare batteries are cheap.

Weaknesses:    Heavy. Charge time is long.

Bottom Line:   
I wanted to night ride but didn't want to lay out the $$$ to cover the specs. After researching on the web and borrowing from several other ideas I stumbled onto the fact that an MR16 Halogen lamp fits in a Maglite body. After stripping out a dead Maglite and experimenting a little I was on my first nightride. Wooo! Yeah, at 5.5 lbs it aint for weight watchers, but if you ride the weeknights with it and take of that extra weight for the weekend stomps you find yourself literally FLYING on those trails. Check out my setup at www.freewebs.com/trapper
Building your own light is a 5 for rating, but a 4 overall due to weight.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   OP Schnabel

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $50.00

Purchased At:   parts stores

Similar Products Used:   None

Bike Setup:   2003 Enduro S-Works

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Dan a Cross Country Rider from Traverse City, Michigan USA

Date Reviewed: April 24, 2003

Strengths:    Very bright lights (choose 20, 35, or 55 watts both), uses standard MR-16 bulbs, long burn time up to 4 hours, durable PVC housings, super bright flashing LED taillight.

Weaknesses:    Heavy battery (could be remedied by going with a NiMH pack)

Bottom Line:   
This lighting system rivals the boughten units hands down. It is complete with a very bright attention getting LED taillight. It was not cheap to build, nor is it cheap in quality. It is compatible with the gamut of readily available MR-16 reflector bulbs. I use it in winter commuting, and plan to build a more compact version of it for my road bike. You can see photos and details here.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Price Paid:    $120.00

Purchased At:   Home Depot, Radio Shack

Similar Products Used:   6-volt 3-watt bottle dynamos, clip on LED flashers

Bike Setup:   NEXT brand REVOLUTION model 6061 aluminum mountain bike, hardtail with front shocks and seatpost suspension

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Graeme a Weekend Warrior from Newcast;le, Australia

Date Reviewed: September 24, 2002

Strengths:    Update from review a couple of years ago-- Still using this system however I have changed the battery to 2 6 volts in series shrinkwrapped together to give 4.5ah @ 12 volts BUT able to fit into a standard bidon cage.

Have used in the pissing down rain without problems so would say that contrary to how it looks seems to be waterproof. html address for easy to follow plans for the electrically inept are at
http://www.uws.edu.au/vip/fathersa/lightmk4.htm
CHEAP and BRIGHT


Weaknesses:    LOOKS cheap and dull.
Battery mounting is all important because of the weight and also the hassle of removing and reinstalling - better the install the better it is.


Bottom Line:   
These lights are all go but no show. For people who would rather spend their money on a decent fork than $300 bucks on flash looking lights that underperform the simplest DIY project ever. Oh and it was fun building and tweaking them!

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Killingworth

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Price Paid:    $50.00

Similar Products Used:   previous cheap incarnation. RCA connectors - now using easier to install (no soldering) dual hobby plugs - ask someone at a electronic hobby shop what they'd use

Bike Setup:   Specialised with rhino lites, lx/xt, manitou front, fat bas**rd on seat.

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Andreas a Cross Country Rider from Tucson

Date Reviewed: January 15, 2002

Strengths:    Cheap, infinitely customizable, ultrabright, super efficient, super light, can be run from 9V batteries or AA's!

Weaknesses:    infinitely customizable, not as waterproof yet as superexpensive setups (yet), not as secure on the bike as would have liked (yet)

Bottom Line:   
As an electrical Engineer I was lucky enough to have a perfect setup at work to make my own PCB's of circuits I wanted. I also employed ULTRABRIGHT LED's in parallel and of different colors (white LED's however awesome they are, they're not as bright and are MUCH more expensive).
LED's, unlike incandescent lights, are EXTREMELY efficient (i.e. converts most of electrical energy into light) and therefore need much smaller batteries (i.e. lighter weight) to work with. Also, LED's are virtually foolproof and have virtually infinite life.
LED's need only 20mA at ~3V (60mW)for brightest light compared to incandescent lights. Assuming you're using a 14.4V 20W light system, the incandescent buld would consume ~1.4A ( that's the equivalent of 70 -SEVENTY- ULTRABRIGHT LED's).
If anybody wants to contact me, feel free:
ageorgiades@gain.com
Andreas Georgiades

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Fantasy Island

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $50.00

Purchased At:   Homemade

Similar Products Used:   None worthy of mention

Bike Setup:   Schwinn (RIP) '99 Homegrown PRO, XTR all around, Hugi 240N wheel setup, Syncros cranks, Selle Italia Gel etc. etc.
20lbs

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Gene a Cross Country Rider from Tallahassee, FL, US

Date Reviewed: October 21, 2001

Strengths:    Cheap, repairable, and disposable. Very bright.

Weaknesses:    Ugly, 12V 7 amp/hr battery (scavenged from a computer UPS)is heavy

Bottom Line:   
25W spot-beam with a coke can wrapped and hose-clamped around it, filled with RTV, and then hose-clamped to my handlebar.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Munson Hills

Duration Product Used:   3 months

Price Paid:    $5.00

Purchased At:   Scavenged from junk

Similar Products Used:   Niterider

Bike Setup:   Commuting - Peugeot MTB with slicks, racks (F&R), fenders, dropbars, and bar-end shifters
Off-road - Scott Peak with a mix of Suntour and Shimano mid-level components, Manitou Magnums

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Nacho a Cross Country Rider from Mexico City

Date Reviewed: September 21, 2001

Strengths:    Home made, easily replacable parts, inexpensive

Weaknesses:    Need to be very thourough and careful with connections, may not be as watertight as an off the shelf system.

Bottom Line:   
Not knowing where the guys here bought the SLA 7.0 Ah Battery I walked into a radio shack and bought a 7.2V, 3000 mAh 'TurboBattery' for RC Cars with a 5 hour charger. I hooked it up with RCA's to a cheap handlebar battery light and replaced the original bulb with a GE PR12 6.0V Bulb, and held the battery under the top-tube (Night Owl style) with Velcro Straps.

This light and stealthy system is bright enough for commuting and lasts a long time; it may not be too bright for trail riding, but the battery shines bright with a 6V 20W halogen bulb (29Watts @7.2V), but I need to find a metal reflector for them.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Chiluca

Duration Product Used:   Less than 1 month

Price Paid:    $50.00

Purchased At:   Radio Shack

Similar Products Used:   Cygolite, Battery operated Handlebar lights

Bike Setup:   Mountain, Cyclocross & Tandem

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Graeme Low a Weekend Warrior from Newcastle,NSW,Australia

Date Reviewed: April 22, 2001

Strengths:    cheap, satisfaction of DYI, VERY bright, flexible

Weaknesses:    bodgy connections can spell troubel!

Bottom Line:   
hitched up 2 12v 20w halogen globes, one spot and one flood to 4.5Ah SLA battery, took me about 3 hours to set up (I have never done anything electrical before). First time out down rough downhill, I lost one of the battery connections, but had torch with me for just such an emergency, get the connections strong and all is well, I now use audio RCA's.
40w is great, and 1/3 the cost of an equivalent system from the shop. it really pisses friends off when you tell them how much your way brighter system cost. (thanks to the Fat Hippy for the plans)

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   single track at night!

Duration Product Used:   Less than 1 month

Price Paid:    $45.00

Purchased At:   Electronic Hoby shop

Similar Products Used:   none

Bike Setup:   Mongoose rockadile, deore and acera

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Mark C a Weekend Warrior from NW England

Date Reviewed: February 4, 2001

Strengths:    CHEAP!
bulbs, £3 each. Battery, £20. light casings, £4 each. Bracket home-made. switches and wire found in the workshop

*Very bright, very robust. 50W spot, 20W flood


Weaknesses:    7Ah Battery weighs a lot (~6lbs), but stored in waist pack, I hardly notice it.

Bottom Line:   
20W adequate for technical and low speeds
50W cuts through the dark and also very effective in fog

I intend to experiment with different bulb combinations, perhaps a lower power 'low beam', with the 50W spot.

Why pay 100's of $/£ for inferior lighting?

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Wales, Peak, Yorks.

Duration Product Used:   Less than 1 month

Price Paid:    $45.00

Purchased At:   B & Q, Plumbing shop

Similar Products Used:   none

Bike Setup:   Kona Blast, Judy XC 100mm fork

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Brian a Cross Country Rider from London, Ontario, Canada

Date Reviewed: November 27, 2000

Strengths:    Cheap!!
40 watts of total power makes for no-reservations cross country riding.
pretty robust
lasts about 4 hours on low beam, 8.5 with different bulb
inexpensive!!


Weaknesses:    battery weighs about 5 pounds and likes to abandon ship at speed, extinguishing lights.
mounting is difficult


Bottom Line:   
I am using this space to review my own light creation, and I hope others can put together some lights and tell us about them here
Mine is a dual beam, flood/spot, 20w/20w 12v halogen system.
This light definitely puts out ample light for high speed cross country riding. The flood is good for average riding, but when the speeds pick up or the trail gets tricky the spot really improves your sight range.
The lead/acid battery is really the only flaw. I'm trying to find a suitable nicad that can be bought for cheap, but the SLA battery was only 25 canadian at a pawnshop and lasts forever. email me if you want more info or some instructions on making your own.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   Less than 1 month

Price Paid:    $40.00

Purchased At:   all over

Similar Products Used:   cateye HL500 junk

Bike Setup:   cannondale f700sx, Lefty, Mag. Clara ('00)

Overall Rating:2
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Tom Diaz a Cross Country Rider from Edwards Air Force Base, California

Date Reviewed: September 1, 2000

Strengths:    Hooey! Some bright, this buggah!

Weaknesses:    Big motorcycle battery dragged my rack down onto my rear brakes.

Bottom Line:   
This worked okay for my flat 13 mile road commute in New Mexico, but those days are gone and it's time for a new attempt or a real (expensive) light system. I'm doing some research in both directions and easing the wife into the idea of spending $300 on a Jet, Nightrider or similar level system. I currently commute across 6-10 miles of Mojave Desert, so carrying a 14 amp-hour motorcycle battery is no longer a viable option.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Ride home from work

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $45.00

Purchased At:   Spare parts bin in garage

Similar Products Used:   Mag lite strapped to front rack, mini-mag strapped to helmet and Cateye Micro-Halogen.

Bike Setup:   Mid 80's Cannondale mountain/touring or Schwinn S-20 depending on gear load and mood.

Reviews 1 - 11 (11 Reviews Total)

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