Rigid Unsuspended Forks Front Shock

4.06/5 (34 Reviews)
MSRP : $5.00


Product Description

Rigid Unsuspended Forks


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Reviews 1 - 15 (34 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by xmessenger a Weekend Warrior from Victoria, BC.

Date Reviewed: February 22, 2011

Strengths:    Weight,lack of maintenance,power transmission especially for climbs.Price!

Weaknesses:    Sussies are superior on rooted/rock strewn trails and most drops and downhills.

Bottom Line:   
I have a 96 project2 and use my bike for the city and light trails mostly, and I'm quite pleased with it.going over wooden bridges this fork does smooth out the jabbing of the washboard,handles very precisely and makes the front end very flickable. For what I use my bike for, this fork compliments the old skool Tange Ultralight frame perfectly. I really don't miss suspension but then I'm not doing any hairy trails either.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   any

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $30.00

Purchased At:   Recyclistas

Similar Products Used:   suspension

Bike Setup:   1992 Rocky mountain team comp w/ PROJECT 2 TB.Gatorskins. A street set-up.

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Luke Sheehan a Cross Country Rider from Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Date Reviewed: March 28, 2005

Strengths:    teachs you to ride the trail, 'feels' great, light, strong, err cheep too?

Weaknesses:    long, rough, high speed descents eventually become more painful than fun

Bottom Line:   
I've only ridden rigid since I got my kona and didn't realise just how lazy a rider I was. Rigid forks force you to actively ride/experience every inch of the trail, it's awesome! Also in technical terrain you have better control over the front wheel and, importantly, the geometry of your bike doesn't change because you just rode over a big rock and your forks compressed by 80mm. If you're prepared to ride your ass off you can stiil compete/beat your friends on full sussers, and that makes it more fun anyway! The only down side for me is comfort over long distances, I just did my first solo 24hr and had to stop for a fair while as I started to loose feeling in my hands(could'nt feel the brakes!) so for this type of event I will probably buy a sus fork (any sugestions?)however I'll probably continue to run the rigid the rest of the time- it's just too much fun!

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Favorite Trail:   long curvy ones

Duration Product Used:   6 months

Price Paid:    $150.00

Similar Products Used:   bouncy, springy ones

Bike Setup:   kona unit, avid discs, fat tyres, carbon bar, and of course project two rigid fork

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Mike T. a Cross Country Rider from Ontario Canada

Date Reviewed: December 25, 2004

Strengths:    Lightness - 700g, simplicity, looks, no maintenance. Shock absorbtion (over a steel fork).

Weaknesses:    Not 3+" of suspension.

Bottom Line:   
This is the Pace RC31 carbon fiber rigid fork. For general xc this is an awesome fork that is far more forgiving than a steel rigid fork - no more stinging wrists and hands!

It's about ½ the weight of most suspension forks and, of course, needs zero maintenance.

It gives very direct steering but it has the ability to soften the trail chatter. Relative to a steel rigid fork it feels like I have 2" of suspension.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Price Paid:    $300.00

Purchased At:   www.johnatkinscycles.com

Similar Products Used:   Spicer, Cannondale, Specialized rigid forks.

Bike Setup:   Seven Sola, King hubs, Sapim CX-Ray spokes, Formula disc brakes, Moots Ti post and stem, DT-Swiss rims, Boone Ti chainrings.

Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Adam W a Cross Country Rider from Avon CT USA

Date Reviewed: October 5, 2003

Strengths:    you can feel what your riding over, better turning, light, every color possible, strong, makes you look tough for doing jumps with no suspension

Weaknesses:    a little jarring over roots and jumps

Bottom Line:   
awesome for small jumps and winter riding. With the kind of brakes i have, coupled with the forks insanely light weight, make the bike light enough to climb hills. I would advise to use suspension whenever its warm enough, but use these for winter

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Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Purchased At:   came on my 1997 Diamondback outlook

Similar Products Used:   I used to ride Freestlye races and i have had everything from no suspension forks to a manitou dorado

Bike Setup:   I only use this in the winter because suspension freezes in cold weather. Diamondback outlook m515 pedals, random non suspension fork, gel seat, rockshox suspension seatpost, pushback brakes (the kind where you pedal backwards and it stops, there popular with childrens bikes. Brakes are pretty useless in snow and ice anyway)

Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:5
Submitted by DiRT a Racer from USA

Date Reviewed: March 1, 2003

Strengths:    Lighten your load. For winter commuting/riding, rigid is a must.

Weaknesses:    Not really that much fun.

Bottom Line:   
I put on a rigid fork for winter commuting. The ride is not as harsh in winter, snow/ice gives a little, but I need the direct control and shocks don't work well in sub 0 temps. Plus salty roads wear out a shock.

Rigid riding has its appeal, and a different technique: hold the bar a little loose and float over loose/rough stuff. But I don't find its appeal is higher than my suspension fork--just different use.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Purchased At:   odds-n-ends LBS


Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Eric a Cross Country Rider from Tulsa OK

Date Reviewed: February 26, 2003

Strengths:    Simple, no yearly rebuilds, no brake dive, it won't need parts that will be discontinued next year, it will improve your riding skill and teach you to pick good lines.

Weaknesses:    It's not 'cool' there is no travel to brag to your buddies about, mine has no disc mount, mine isn't light, but some are. What do you expect for free?

Bottom Line:   
Rigid is cheap. Rigid can be light. (usually not both) Rigid will show you the way. Rigid will make you a really proficient rider. Ride rigid, ride well. Then when you go to suspension, you will flow like water on the trail. You won't just flop around hanging on for dear life as your bike careens down the trail scaring the bloody piss out of all who see you. My friends can barely keep up with me on my rigid singlespeed. Because of that, when I ride my full suspension bike, they only see me when I stop to wit for them.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   All of them

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Purchased At:   found in attic of lbs

Similar Products Used:   Lots of suspension forks, great on the right bike but not this one.

Bike Setup:   Waterford 2400 converted to singlespeed, Truvativ ss cranks, Campy (yes campy) mtn rims, Campy hiflange front hub, and a steel rigid fork from a Schwinn Frontier. (239$)
No wonder the fork's heavy.

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Skinny from Vic, BC, Can

Date Reviewed: January 28, 2003

Strengths:    -they WILL make you a better rider
-lotsa fun (as long as you have any sort of skill on a bike whatsoever)
-no one will steal your bike cuz it looks cheap!


Weaknesses:    -not great for big drops unless you're REALLY good


Bottom Line:   
to all of you people who say rigid is a bone jarring ride: GET SOME SKILLS, RIDE SMOOTH!!!!! the first three years i was riding, i rode rigid, and i can safely say that it made me 10 times smoother. Now i've gone back to rigid, and i'm having a blast. my bike accelerates like a bat outta hell, it doesn't look expensive so no one will wanna steal it, and it's way more fun for skate parks/dirt jumps......bottom line: for any style riding, rigid forks will make you smoother, better, faster, guarunteed.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Price Paid:    $10.00


Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by coggsworth a Weekend Warrior from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Date Reviewed: November 12, 2002

Strengths:    To all those who say rigid forks are weaker than suspension forks, think BMX. Those guys on the half pipes consistantly getting 12' of air don't ride suspension. The guys riding Dirt Jumps, also getting over 10' of air, don't hardly use suspension. Trials riders, who are consistantanly abusive to their bikes, ,use rigid forks. Why? because they give you a direct feel of what your bike is doing.

Weaknesses:    Beginner riders will have to learn to handle obstacles rather than bomb over them. You wont win any Downhill races with a rigid fork. They will screw up your f.s. freeride bikes impeccable handling. ;-)

Bottom Line:   
To me, riding a bike is not all about speed or comfort. You can say rigid forks are unsafe, but I'd say that the beginner rider on a 8" travel d.h. bike bombing down a hill with no idea how to control his bike is far more dangerous than the bouncy vibro massaged guy on a rigid fork who can't go too fast because, well, he can't!
I submit this: I never change oil, springs air pressure, I never worry about seals, stiction or rebound dampening. I ride down hills that my F.S. buddies who race the Canada Cup circut wouldn't touch. On a rigid bike with fat tires

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Similar Products Used:   Planet X rigid forks, an array of rigid forks, all cromo steel. Judy XL's, Manitou EFC, and the original Rock Shox

Bike Setup:   I ride a 'freeride hardtail' that I've modified into a 'freeride rigid' that I use for trials, freeriding, XC, grocery shopping, cruising for chicks. Get a unicrown rigid fork with only disc mounts, and you're going to look way cooler than the loser with the dual triple clamp 8" travel downhill fork straining his back to lift the damn front end over a log.

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Alfred Klek a Cross Country Rider from Guilford, CT, USA

Date Reviewed: November 15, 2001

Strengths:    light, cheap, cool looking (ha, that was a joke BTW). YOU CAN FEEL WHAT YOU ARE RIDING OVER

Weaknesses:    sometimes it hurts

Bottom Line:   
i like riding rigid. every once and a while i say to myself "self, maybe it's time you got a suspension fork." then i pass someone riding some FS job and i don't.
riding rigid is what makes MTBing MTBing for me. if i don't want to deal with rocks and roots and stuff i'll ride on the road. i like thinking about my line and how much hitting that big f***ing rock in the middle of the trail is going to hurt a lot if i hit it, so i don't (or i hit it right so it doesn't hurt).
someone here said that if you mess up a landing on a jump it hurts a lot. man, what a piece of rocket science that is. of course it's going to hurt, you messed it up, it should hurt! next time you get to a jump say to yourself "hmmmm, that hurt last time when i messed up my landing, i guess this time i won't mess up my landing."
there is also the downhill thing. i can do a downhill almost as fast as most suspended riders because i have learned through painful realizations in the past that if you hit a rock without a shock, you will come off the trail and lose your steering which can lead to going off the trail and hitting a tree or a bear or something. this makes downhilling a "challenge" which in my opinion is far more exciting than barreling down a big rocky hill at 25MPH. there is also the realization that if you go down a hill, you're eventually going to have to come up it again. going uphill is an undisputable advantage of riding rigid where the extra control and lighter weight give you the advantage.
Anyhow i guess the real bottom line is that mountain biking is, in essence, a pretty dumb sport. if i wanted to travel on singletrack to see the scenery, the easiest way to do it is by walking it. by taking a machine that was originally designed for people to get around on in cities we, as MTBers, provide ourselves with a challenge that does not have to be there. riding with suspension takes away part of that challenge, the challenge that we all silently agree to when we start riding. on a side note however, most of my friends ride suspended (both hardtail and FS) and they still enjoy riding and i enjoy riding with them. there are sections of trail where they go faster than me because they are suspended, and sections of trails where i go faster because i ride rigid. i'm sure they get more enjoyment out of downhills than i do, but i probably get more enjoyment out of technical work than they do. anyhow, whatever, i ride rigid and i like it (so there).

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   westwoods

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Purchased At:   mountain city cycle, vernon (?) CT

Similar Products Used:   can't honestly say that i've ever ridden a suspension fork for any considerable amount of time.

Bike Setup:   man, do i have to type in all this stuff again? cromo mongoose from the old days (pre-K-Mart) XT and LX drivetrain parts

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Pascal Cormeau from Good Old CANADA

Date Reviewed: October 22, 2001

Strengths:    Rigid forks are very stiff, .light and have a unique feel. They are perfect for trials and give any rider far better controll.

Weaknesses:    Tripple nothing seals, 12 inches of plush reboundless bend travel(off big drops). Also, very hard on wrists and arms.

Bottom Line:   
I once heared that many gay people like to ride suspention forks. I love rigid forks. SUSPENTION IS FOR LOSER, GAY PEOPLE, FREE-RIDERS OR DOWNHILLERS. Ever since I got into trials, I have never even considered going back to squish. The main advantage is that you can get really hopity because they are light and stiff. With suspention forks, your energy is waisted when you bunny-hop so that you don't go as heigh.

If you are into downhill or like to huck big, rigid is not the way to go. The reason for this is simply that rigid forks aren't strong enough to take high-impacts. They bend... But for cross contry (gram couning retards) and trials, rigid forks are just the ticket.

Another sweetness factor of rigid forks is the feel! You have complete control over your bike. Trick that are normally almost impossible become easy: ex nose weelies and J-hops.

In my mind, the best rigid fork on the market today is a double crown wonder with no travel and disc brake hangars made by KEWL Komponents USA.

If I have no convinced you that rigid forks are the way to go, allow me to suggest the Bomber Atom 80: the best fork in the world. The only problem with this fork is the price ($600 Canadian ouch!).

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $200.00

Purchased At:   Bow Cycle

Similar Products Used:   Jett XC, Judy SL, atom 80(sweeeeeeeeeet) catwalkin' with no fork

Bike Setup:   Norco Team Trials frame and fork w/ XTR components

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by woodsy dan from ann arbor, mi, usa

Date Reviewed: October 14, 2001

Strengths:    This fork is sleek and supple, yet has very little torsional flex. It tracks straight and absorbs trail chatter supebly. The welds are flawless and the paint has stayed on it through many good knocks. Vicious Cycles' products are strong light and dependable (and made by a bike nut in NY).

Weaknesses:    It usually won't get you laid

Bottom Line:   
Its the good stuff! Buy one so Snarl can keep making a living. Buy one to improve your ride. Buy one because you are a smart monkey

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   sheltowee trace kentucky

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $200.00

Purchased At:   special ordered from local shop

Similar Products Used:   Fat City Big One Inch, Fat City YoEddy Team Fork, countless other rigid forks, too many boinger forks

Bike Setup:   Fat City Buck Shaver with parts on it

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by pk a Cross Country Rider from raleigh

Date Reviewed: August 28, 2001

Strengths:    Light, no maintenance, no bob, tracks well.

Weaknesses:    downhills can be a bit rough

Bottom Line:   
In response to Clay's post:
There are quite a few quality rigid forks available out there. Starting about $125 on up.
Actually, the cheapest I found was $60 for a Kona P2 (chromoly).
The following are all chromoly:
Vicious Cycles: $200. Custom paint, disc tabs available.
Independent Fabrications: $250. Custom paint available.
Sycip: @ $225. 2 options: tig welded or lugged.
Tom Teesdale Cycles (TET): $125
Kelly Bikes: $250.
Strong Bicycles: @$200.
Supposedly Ritchey has one available, although it is not posted on their website.

Those are the ones I can remember offhand. I am using a Vicious Cycles fork right now. Cantilever option. I am very pleased with it.
A good place to post fork questions is the singlespeed message board on this site. Very helpful folks.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   6 months

Price Paid:    $200.00

Purchased At:   Direct from Vicious Cycles

Similar Products Used:   headshok, tange forks; tested manitou, rockshox

Bike Setup:   Steel rigid, 2.1 Michelins, XT group.

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Clay Holt a Cross Country Rider from Yuma AZ U.S.A

Date Reviewed: August 24, 2001

Strengths:    Light-weight,no-upkeep,no-bob,no-dive in cornering-braking.(I can go real fast,and climb like a monkey)

Weaknesses:    None;except for lack of custom products to select from.and they are not good for hammering on rock or real nasty dirt roads.(But I have a Paragon W/SX-R for that)I've only found 3 aftermarket forks,and as is they just don't cut the mustard.

Bottom Line:   
For transportation,(chasing roadies)exersize,saftey,speed,its the ticket.I'm hoping a mtbr staffer will read this and open a colume for rigid forks so I can find a nice custom piece for my baby.I like the wound-up carbon cyclocross fork,but they don't seem to make a one for mountian bikes.MTBR should have done this a long time ago.For everyday riding my hardtail is too slow,and my road bike is too dangerious,while my rigid mountian bike is perfect,I can run over stormdrains,gravel-berms,and soft shoulders,with impunity(try that MR 700x20c)Plus Yumas lousey roads compounded by lousey drivers,are less of a threat to life and limb,on a mountian bike.and for gettin' around here its the ticket.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Anywhere-Anytime

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Price Paid:    $150.00

Purchased At:   Two-Wheel Transportation

Similar Products Used:   Alloy,cro-mo,

Bike Setup:   cad1 w/lotsa goodies but twisted frame,bent fork,(building new bike)

Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:3
Submitted by Speed demon a Downhiller from TN

Date Reviewed: August 18, 2001

Strengths:    No maint. -----light---climbs good

Weaknesses:    Any DH runs suck on a Rigid unless you just wanna "Take it EASY" & cruise like a hippie !

Bottom Line:   
Rigid forks WILL improve your skills somehow....When you go back to a 3" fork you just Slay ! I TESTED rigid VS 3-4" forks for 2 years ! switching back & forth doing the same trails & new ones too...BOTTOM line suspension rules..Rigid's are ok for temperary use for training ....Get REAL & buy a cushy fork before your hands fall off !!!! Rigid's are a thing of the past.............

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Flowing fast technical ones !

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Purchased At:   LBS

Similar Products Used:   Monster-T...Z.1 qr20 5"/////Z.5 qr20 4"-----Manitiou Spyder ---Indy XC----Z.4-----Judy XC 3" -----X-vert-T 4" ----

Bike Setup:   Slalom hardtail......

Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Philipp from Hannover, Germany

Date Reviewed: May 5, 2001

Bottom Line:   
Rigid forks have some great advantages: they are light, stiff and cheap. They make every ride much more difficult and they are the only way becoming a good rider. On the other hand agressive riders or agressive trails will be a problem: because of the stiffness your frame or your rims can be damaged, and the feeling of riding downhill with an rigid fork is not very cool.
The way I prefer is called HeadShok: if the trail is not to rough, i can lock them out easily and have a fork that is almost as stiff as a rigid fork. If I need suspension, I can simply turn it on again and have 80mm of travel. But HeadShok is of course not as lightweight and as cheap.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   1 Year


Reviews 1 - 15 (34 Reviews Total) | Next 15

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