Birdy 7 speed & 3x7 Bike 1998 or Older

5/5 (5 Reviews)
MSRP : $1000.00


Product Description

Birdy 7 speed & 3x7


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Reviews 1 - 5 (5 Reviews Total)

User Reviews

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:4
Submitted by birdybiker a Cross Country Rider from New York

Date Reviewed: June 17, 2007

Strengths:    Rides like a full sized bike, or better! Folds to a compact size in 10-30 seconds. Can take it on trains, busses.

Weaknesses:    No major weeknesses yet, other than the price. (Worth it, and the hand built frame is available with cheap components for $900.)

Bottom Line:   
Perhaps the best touring bike in that it packs quickly into an airline legal suitcase. It rides as well as a big bike, and is, in my opinion as fast. (The upright speed record was set on a Moutlon, which is very similar in design.)

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   All

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $1200.00

Purchased At:   Used

Similar Products Used:   Dahon Mu SL

Bike Setup:   Shimano 105/XT

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by brendan elliott a Cross Country Rider from Canada

Date Reviewed: May 29, 2007

Strengths:    I purchased the Birdy Blue which has 24 gears (3 in the hub).
An mazing bicycle that (almost) drive likes a big bike. Packs into a suitcase and I took it to Australia and cycled from Brisbane to Sidney on it fully loaded to the hilt.
Ortleib panniers on the front and rear, plus the largest Arkel handlebar bag you can buy. My tent was strapped across the rack.
This bike is a strong beast.
I fixed my faithfull old Brookks saddle and off I went for 1,200km's. Only one flat tyre.


Weaknesses:    The little beast creaks - so what!

Bottom Line:   
A fantastic machine if you seriusly want to pack a bike in a suitcase and then travel self-contained when you arrive. The Birdy does impose weight limits on the expedition rack and the low rider but I ignored them all after I pre-tested it before I set off. I tortured the little beast with tons of weight. If it complained, it wasn't going to come with me. It didn't!

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   greatbrendini@gmail.com

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Price Paid:    $1500.00

Purchased At:   Vancouver Canada

Similar Products Used:   None, but I have a Trek 520 that I usually use for long distance touring. No comparison as the Trek is it! It's as far as evolution can be. But having said that, Birdy is about number five behind the 520.

Bike Setup:   Fold-up 24 speed with 3 gears in the hub.

Overall Rating:5
Submitted by Peter de Leuw a Weekend Warrior from Hamburg, Germany

Date Reviewed: September 12, 1999

Strengths:    
Tool-free folding within seconds, light weight. Good suspension, maintanance-free, three kinds of rear suspension elastomers (changes without tools). Leading link front fork eliminates front-end dive during braking. Even distances up to 100 km are comfortable to ride with the Birdy.


Weaknesses:    
Belt drive/4 gear hub slides when it becomes wet, belt drive/7 gear hub wears out rapidly. (Actual chain drive works good.)
There are no durable tires available, yet (may change in autumn/winter 1999).
Folding size in comparison to the Bromton folding bike bigger.


Bottom Line:   
For me the best folding bike available. Great for commuting with car or train (needs no additional ticket!).
For more informations see http://members.aol.com/pdeleuw/Birdy.html

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   
2 Years

Similar Products Used:   
short ridings on Brompton and Bernds folding bikes


Bike Setup:   
Birdy green from Riese und Müller in Germany, puchased in Germany: Aluminium frame, full suspension (front: spring with foam insert, rear: elastomer), 18 inch wheels, folded size 76*58*28 cm, 11.2 kg.
The bike came originally with a belt drive and 4 speed internal gear hub (Shimano Inter 4) and RapidFire shifter, side pull brake and weak, yellow rear elastomer. Later models came with another belt drive and 7 speed hub (Shimano Inter 7), GripShift and V-brake.
Actual models come with the Shimano Inter 7 and chain drive.

Overall Rating:5
Submitted by Tim McNamara a Weekend Warrior from St. Paul

Date Reviewed: August 31, 1999

Strengths:    
Folds to a compact package in under 45 seconds. Light weight, dual suspension bike with Sachs 3 x 7 gear system. Unique anti-dive front fork geometry. Rear elastomer changes in seconds.


Weaknesses:    
Tire availability is limited due to small size (18) but does come in a knobby and a smoother tread tire suitable for road and hardpack. I found the stock saddle unsuitable; the small diameter tires wear faster than 26 tires and rolling resistance is a little higher. The bike does have quite a few rattles in it from the V brakes and cable housing.


Bottom Line:   
A great bike, not suitable for gonzo DH or really gnarly singletrack, but useful for many dirt rides, with the benefit that you can keep it in the car for spontaneous rides, and no one will know you have it in the trunk. Also very good for commuting- fold it up and bring it inside!

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   
Mississippi River bottoms

Duration Product Used:   
1 Year

Similar Products Used:   
Bike Friday


Bike Setup:   
Riese und MŸller Birdy folding bike, designed in Germany and built in Taiwan. Imported to the U.S. by Burley Design Cooperative. Sachs 3 x 7 system with Sachs Wavey shifters (GripShift style), Dia-Comp levers and V-brakes. Elastomer rear suspension and spring/elastomer front suspension; the Birdy folds at the suspension pivot points.

Overall Rating:5
Submitted by Bob Gelman a Weekend Warrior from Berkeley, CA

Date Reviewed: August 30, 1999

Strengths:    
Dual Suspension, Light Weight,
Folded Size


Weaknesses:    
Only one 18 tire currently available.


Bottom Line:   
The Birdy is a German design, built in Taiwan full suspension folding bike. Folded size is 30x23x11.
There is a 7 speed (22 lb.) and a 21 speed (3x7 - 24 lb) model. There is a group discussion and information at :
http://www.egroups.com/group/birdybike/ For more information links, see: http://www.egroups.com/docvault/birdybike/Links While I would not recommend the Birdy for the roughest off-road trails, it is more than sufficient for what most people use these bikes for most of the time. Its folded size and light weight give it a lot of advantages if you're not heading down Mt. Everest. Don't bother with Bike racks for your SUV; just keep it in your trunk, always.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   
2 Years


Reviews 1 - 5 (5 Reviews Total)

Review Options:  Sorted by Latest Review | Sort by Best Rating


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