Maverick Speedball Remote Dropper Seatpost

3.72/5 (25 Reviews)


Product Description

The perfect upgrade for better control in all-terrain riding and specially on steep downhills. The Speedball allows quick and easy lowering or raising of the saddle through three inches of unlimited adjustment by pushing a handlebar-mounted, multidirectional lever 7000 series aluminium 380mm shaft length Available in 30.9mm and 31.6mm

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Reviews 1 - 15 (25 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:3
Submitted by esm a Cross Country Rider from Rossland, BC CAN

Date Reviewed: August 18, 2011

Strengths:    Lasted me longer than any other adjustable post I have used.

Weaknesses:    Not readily available anymore and side to side play.

Bottom Line:   
My post lasted a bit over a year and then was rebuilt for $50. Unfortunately that only lasted a few months. Not as smooth and effective as the KS but it lasted longer.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Cannot name just one

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Price Paid:    $225.00

Purchased At:   Revolution Cycles

Similar Products Used:   KS

Bike Setup:   It was on my old SC 4x.

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by winsail a Cross Country Rider from Soquel, CA 95073

Date Reviewed: May 2, 2011

Strengths:    Great solid height adjustable seatpost at perfect price. It has helped my riding immensely

Weaknesses:    drift pin to change from lever to remote near impossible to remove.

Bottom Line:   
Amazing value and you can find rebuilt/ new ones online from the current servicing company. It is a must have for me now.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Enchanted Loop

Duration Product Used:   6 months

Price Paid:    $40.00

Purchased At:   Craigslist

Similar Products Used:   Joplin, Gravity Dropper

Bike Setup:   WTB saddle and remote Maverick Speedball

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:4
Submitted by mtbhead a Downhiller from San Joser, CA, USA

Date Reviewed: August 27, 2010

Strengths:    Still working great after over 3 years of hard riding. Remote is awesome.

Weaknesses:    Developed some rotational play over time, but it doesn't bother me when I ride. Did have one "blow-out" episode at about the 2-year mark when the main seal blew at the beginning of a ride - had to swap posts while it was getting overhauled/repaired

Bottom Line:   
Gravity Dropper was a revolutionary product for All Mountain riding and Freeriding. Maverick followed with an excellent product, and this remote version has been perfect for my AM/FR machine. 3" is just barely enough in my opinion - lowers the seat just enough for steep drops/roll-ins and for hucking stuff. Yes, it developed some side-to-side (rotational) play over time, but it doesn't bother me, and I think all of the adjustable posts are going to have this to some extent (at least over time - if you're really using them hard, which I do). Yes, the main seal blew on me at about the 2-year mark, but the overhaul was less than $90, and was as good as new aftwerward - which didn't shock me for the amount of riding/abuse this thing has seen. I still think it's been an awesome product, and a mandatory addition to any AM/FR rig. Maverick no longer makes them, but the Crank Brothers Joplin is essentially the same thing, with minor improvements.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Ride Don't Slide

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Price Paid:    $250.00

Similar Products Used:   Crank Brothers Joplin 4R (just got one - only because I wanted to try a 4" version)

Bike Setup:   Nomad - setup for hucking.

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by norcaloffroad a Weekend Warrior from san jose, ca

Date Reviewed: April 21, 2010

Strengths:    Super reliable

Weaknesses:    None

Bottom Line:   
This is my first adjustable seat post so I admit that I have nothing to compare it to, but it works perfectly. I have only made one cable adjustment in about 6 months of riding, so I cannot complain.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   ucsc, wilder

Duration Product Used:   6 months

Purchased At:   Came with bike purch

Similar Products Used:   na

Bike Setup:   Ibis Mojo full XT

Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:1
Submitted by dave a Cross Country Rider from england

Date Reviewed: December 1, 2008

Strengths:    no stopping to raise/lower your seat before/after climbs/decents

Weaknesses:    weak product!

Bottom Line:   
When the post is working its awesome. I never used to bother dropping my seat for decents unless they were porper gnarly, but now I can easily drop it all the time. My confidence on the bike has improved allong with my general technical abillity. BUT, the post is weak as...! I've had all teh problems I've now read other people have experienced as well as a couple others. The post dropping on its own, the post not returning, the post not dropping, the clamp on mine sheared clean off (mid wheelie, the post stabbed me in the stomache), the lever clamp moves no matter how tight it is, the cable was too short to route nicely, the cable actually started to wear through my frame after riding long sections with the seat lowered.
REALLY NOT WORTH THE CASH.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Similar Products Used:   N/A

Bike Setup:   scott ransom

Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:1
Submitted by Michael a Racer from Berkeley, CA usa

Date Reviewed: June 2, 2008

Strengths:    Great idea. I like that the lever can be actuated in any direction.

Weaknesses:    1. Outer seatpost shaft is too thin. When you tighten the seat post binder -- tight enough so that the post won't slip down -- the material must be distorting and compromising the ability of the inner, sliding portion of the post to do its thing. This has caused me some major frustration. While on ride the post starts to slip down. Ok, re-set the height and re-tighten the bolt. Oops, got the bolt too tight because the post refuses to rebound or it won't rebound the entire way. Pump the lever, finally it rebounds. Stop, loosen the binder bolt a little. After a few minutes of riding, and raising/lowering the post, I'm the incredible shrinking man...nope, my post is dropping down into the frame 'cause the binder's too loose. Frick. Talk about sucking the mojo right out of a ride.

2. Weak support. I write to them explaining the issue. The post has all but a half-dozen rides on it. Their support asks what brand of frame I'm riding. Santa Cruz Nomad. Oh, well there's the problem, you're riding an inferior frame. You're not riding one of our precision-made frames, frames with such precise seat tube dimensions that this would *never* happen. We recommend that you go to a hobby store and buy thin brass shim stock and that should fix your problem. Oh, and don't grease the post when inserting it into the frame. Um, yeah, right. Thanks for the double order of weak sauce. Let's not discuss the design of the post and the possible root cause of the issue, instead let's blame it on my lo-buck frame... Please.


Bottom Line:   
While I really want to like this post -- and I'll admit to owning three (on three different bikes) -- I have this same issue on all bikes. One post is on a vpfree and the other a fisher 29-inch cross-country bike.

Given that Maverick responded to my issue with such a weak answer their stock plummeted in my world. I've been intrigued by the forks they make but after reading the reviews of them, I doubt that I ever will bother trying them. They sound about as fussy as this post. C'mon guys, these are bikes. Bikes get dirty. And yes, different manufactures will put out frames with varying tolerances. You've got to work better at accommodating the range of equipment that's out there. And you can't make bike components such as this with super finicky tolerances and expect it to perform reliably. Especially given the ways most folks don't bother to maintain their equipment.

And while it's only an uneducated guess on my part regarding the thickness of the outer shaft wall causing the binding issue, given my propensity for cleaning and servicing my bicycle equipment (20+ years riding and wrenching), I can't accept that the issue I'm experiencing is due to the manufacturing tolerances of the frames that I'm riding. Just not buyin'...

I don't think that this post was ready for prime time. And I don't think that Maverick does a good job of supporting it. I know that Crank Brothers has now purchased the rights to this product. I hope they do more than just anodize a few parts and give it a new name or their well-respected customer support arm is gonna get worked in a big way.

It's sad. A great idea but just not quite right. I can't recommend the post.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   6 months

Price Paid:    $150.00

Similar Products Used:   Gravity dropper. I couldn't get used to the butt-bounce on the original Gravity Dropper. But I may be trying their newer turbo post. And a vast collection of rigid posts over the years.

Bike Setup:   Nomad. All-mountain...blah blah

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:4
Submitted by madskier from boulder,co

Date Reviewed: April 24, 2008

Bottom Line:   
I have the opportunity to own and use the GD and the Maverick Speedball back to back in the last year, so I thought I'd chip in.

Firstly, this is one of the best concepts to come to mt biking in the 2 decades I've been riding. Actually, it's revisiting the "Height Rite" of days of yore, but in a much slicker package.

It's hard to underestimate how much your seat height impact your riding. Not just on the downs, but also in terms of efficency climbing. Watch most riders, and you'll see they've split the difference seat height wise (too lazy, etc to drop/raise seat) and how awkard they look.

The GD pioneered the modern version of this and deserve mad kudos for it. They had the handlbar remote first, and I think GD/Speedball would be worthless without it. The GD has a sturdy feel to it, looks like it was made in serious machine shop, with look and feel to match. Actually, that cuts both ways as IMHO it's pretty ugly.

The biggest flaw of GD is that it isn't infinitely adjustable, your stuck trying to hit the designated 1 or 3 or 4 inch drops, and to me it just was never seemless. I'm actually shocked that more GD reviewers haven't mentioned this. Although maybe other riders haven't used the Speedball (somewhere on mtbr there is an inhouse review of GD vs Speedball, pre Speedball remote I believe). Anyhow it never felt effortless to me, you have to do this semi hesitant click of the lever and bump with your ass (whether going up or down) and it just takes a sec, which is the last thing you want in a tough spot. You have to know exactly where the pins are going to catch on the shaft in order to move the seat to the right spot. Maybe akin to clipping into your SPD in rocky terrain... it can be done, and becomes easier with time, but never a snap.

The Speedball is more like a pneumatic office chair, very smooth to adjust and you can literally set it anywhere, which I like. The lever seems a little cheesier than GD but time will tell. The main rap on the Speedball seems to be that no matter what your seat is going to wiggle ever so slightly (something with the internals), so if this is deal breaker to you, forget it. Aslo the GD comes in many sizes down to 27.2 (possibly smaller), but the Speedball only goes in 30.9 and 31.6 (?).

Finally, despite the last review I always found GD customer service to be SUPERIOR. These are good folks, and if you want to speak to the owner, it's very possible and he seems a very good guy.

Lastly these are both in the neighborhood of 500 grams on my scale, so you're picking up maybe .5 lbs from your stock seat...very worth it!

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   South Boundary in Taos,NM

Duration Product Used:   1 Year


Overall Rating:2
Value Rating:1
Submitted by B F a Weekend Warrior from Los Altos

Date Reviewed: April 10, 2008

Strengths:    Great idea, looks decent

Weaknesses:    not reliable, not good for jumping,$$$

Bottom Line:   
Great idea, but still needs improvement. If the the collar is too tight air will sneak by and the post wont stay up when you sit on it and when lowered wont stay down when you unweight the seat . The shop I purchased it at said You have to keep that collar not too tight and not too loose( fargin annoying) for $250 it should be bulletproof! Since then I haven't had too many problems with it but on more problem and it will be on ebay for sure. If you like to jump your bike it feels like it could break and if you pinch your seat with your legs the post rises. Best application would be XC riding with a lot of up and down changes in your ride, then it's a decent product. If you ride straight up then and bomb straight down then a quick release seat clamp and normal post would be better

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   420's

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $250.00

Similar Products Used:   regular posts

Bike Setup:   irrelavent

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Swisgar Swiggles a Cross Country Rider from Mordhaus, netherlands

Date Reviewed: March 12, 2008

Bottom Line:   
Just talkesd with mavericks, dey said to lube the bolt heads and under the silver seat grabbers, not under the cups. BE carefuls when tightening the nut that the silver things are lining up propersly. things can get binding cause its dry and it wont tighten right. Also this nit gets tightened to 140 inch pounds, wich is brutal tight. dats it.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   3 months


Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:3
Submitted by Swisgar Swiggle a Cross Country Rider from Mordhaus

Date Reviewed: March 3, 2008

Strengths:    This seatpost is brutals. It will destroy all seatposts who stands in the way of its path for total seatpost dominations. The maverickopalypse has begun!

Weaknesses:    The seats clamp.

Bottom Line:   
Seat clamp slippsed after one day. I had titnened it propersly. Heres what fixed its: Take the seat off and the clamp assembly. Get some rough (ie from your patches kits)sand paper an scuff the cups and the cup mating surfaces. Use a few drops of blue or red locktit on the copulatesing surface for goods luck. Use some on the clamp bolt as well. Titen her down goods and tight. don't overtitens it or youls be sorrys. ohterwise a usefull weopon in my arssenal of offroad destructions!

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   Less than 1 month

Price Paid:    $215.00

Purchased At:   ebay

Similar Products Used:   salsa quick releases

Bike Setup:   Giants trance

Overall Rating:2
Value Rating:2
Submitted by james graham a Weekend Warrior from Olympia

Date Reviewed: February 4, 2008

Strengths:    Incredible idea

Weaknesses:    Sticks when wet or muddy, even thick dusty. Tempermental.

Bottom Line:   
Great idea, not a fully developed product though. First ride it started sticking down, and not coming up when it got wet/muddy. Sent it back to Maverick, came back and suffered same problems. Very clean looking design compared to the G.D.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   3 months

Price Paid:    $250.00

Purchased At:   Universal

Similar Products Used:   None

Bike Setup:   All Mountain

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Al a Weekend Warrior from Alhambra

Date Reviewed: January 10, 2008

Strengths:    3" of adj height, ease of use, weight

Weaknesses:    only fit 30.9 or 31.6

Bottom Line:   
It's by far the best investment I've spend on a bike, both money, and weight added(which is not too bad at 480g) It help on the descend so much it change my riding forever.

It help boost your confident riding over the nasty stuffs, it's also so easy to start on the steep hill. I improve my cornering skill as well as hops. I found myself using this feature about a dozen time on a regular single track.

Must have for any trail bike.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   rock-it

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $250.00

Purchased At:   Maverick

Similar Products Used:   gravity dropper, Speed ball w/o remote

Bike Setup:   ML8, Duc32, 19 enduro

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Rain Man a Cross Country Rider from Australia

Date Reviewed: January 4, 2008

Strengths:    Looks great, well finished, easy to use.

Weaknesses:    The saddle rail clamp could stand to be re-designed, the current one isn't the best.

Bottom Line:   

This is an update on the Maverick Speedball Remote seatpost.

I've been pounding on it for about 6 months now, and it is still working very well. I have had no major problems with the post, it works every time I hit the remote handlebar mounted lever.

The saddle rail clamp has loosened off on me a couple of times forcing me to stand and pedal. The clamp needs to be redesigned so that you can really tighten it down HARD and stop it moving.

In my original review, I mentioned the actuating post mechanism and how that needs to be redesigned also. It's not a problem unless you use an open cut away leather saddle like the Selle Titanico. It shouldn't worry anyone using a plastic seat though.

I regularly wipe some teflon stanchion lube on the sliding part of the post to keep the seal slippery.

I'm still very happy with the performance of this seatpost. It has survived some very wet weather, plenty of mud and dust, and a few hard crashes without being affected.

The initial cost is high, but as long as it keeps on working, the cost is worth it over time.

I'll update again after a year of use if the post is still working well.

Bottom Line:


4 for Value, 5 for Overall.


Excellent and recommended, so far.



Rainman.






Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Local

Duration Product Used:   6 months

Price Paid:    $250.00

Purchased At:   Universal.

Similar Products Used:   None.

Bike Setup:   RIP 9.

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:3
Submitted by Oso Negro from Sacramento

Date Reviewed: December 31, 2007

Strengths:    Set-Back, Design

Weaknesses:    Cable Routing, Play

Bottom Line:   
Thanks to all the bros who posted on this seatpost- reviews and forums. I read them all and still decided on this one. The Speedball/Joplin works for me and does what I want it to do, but I still pack the old post. I needed the set-back and I liked the design. I will be using it this coming season for trail riding and Super D. I'll let you know if my opinion changes.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Downieville

Duration Product Used:   Less than 1 month

Purchased At:   gift from Santa Cleese

Bike Setup:   '06 Reign 1

Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:1
Submitted by skyboy a Weekend Warrior from lancashire

Date Reviewed: October 29, 2007

Strengths:    great idea,ideal for trail riding

Weaknesses:    simply not engineered well enough,seal(s) let water in,seat clamp poor design

Bottom Line:   
Seal not up to the job,(which is inexcusable,Fox,etc shoxs and forks don't suffer from this) ,after 1 ride in the wet,post refused to move,managed to solve this by fitting an inner tube over post,not something you should have to do on a post costing 3 times that of a Thomson!Seat clamp does not work,because it pulls across it will always work lose no matter how tight the bolt is,Thomson has 2 bolts that pull down never had a problem.Piss poor to be honest

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   anywhere in the alps

Duration Product Used:   3 months

Price Paid:    $360.00

Purchased At:   leisure lakes

Similar Products Used:   none(always used Thomson)

Bike Setup:   07 Heckler,chris king,hope,mavic etc.

Reviews 1 - 15 (25 Reviews Total) | Next 15

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