SRAM Guide RSC Disc Brake System

5/5 (1 Reviews)
MSRP : $199.00


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Product Description

The new SRAM Guide RSC is packed with ride-enhancing performance that makes every new trail a trusted old friend. We started from scratch, to create the perfect combination of braking reliability and control. Brand-new SwingLink™ technology provides more power, silky-smooth modulation, less deadband and better lever-feel than you’ve ever experienced. Steep-line confidence. Deep-corner dominance. Ride every trail like you own it.


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Reviews 1 - 1 (1 Reviews Total)

User Reviews

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by John a All Mountain Rider

Date Reviewed: October 2, 2014

Strengths:    Lever feel, modulation, and adjustability. Gobs of power when needed, and most importantly, quiet. No, seriously, they're quiet.

Weaknesses:    Weight if any. The rotors aren't the lightest.

Bottom Line:   
Background: I have short fingers and large palms. I prefer my brakes with the levers in close, but quick engagement/bite point.

I've been messing around with Avid brakes for the last previous generations. Their Juicy line was pretty decent once you hit the 7's. Great modulation and lever feel/position, but "that" noise. With the addition of some Dangerboy levers, the Juicys just had a perfect fit. The hard braking noise was always persistent.

Skip to the Elixir line. Although I didn't have nearly any issues that many people have described, the Elixir 5's, CR's, and 9 Trails all worked well, when probably set up, bleed, and maintained. Avid has a perfect lever position IMO, with the Elixir included. But the brakes lacked in overall feel and adjustability. The CR's and 5's worked, but didn't have the bite point adjustability, and always had a built in amount of lever throw, which for a close lever, means nearly at the bars. On the flip side, the Trails worked fantastically with adjustments in bite point, but still gave a bit more lever throw then I would have liked, ironically enough. For all above brakes, there was still "that" noise though.

Now, the Guide RSC. Lever ergonomics reminds me of the replacement Dangerboy or Straitline levers, that one finger , just right sense. The lever feel is smooth and crisp, definitely helped by ball bearings. With adjustments of lever position and bite point, I've been able to get my levers set up just right for my hands: close lever, but quick engagement. Performance wise, these things are killer. Few of the "first ride" articles floating around point to more of a linear feel, which is pretty spot on. Shimano's tend to have a bit of a pop when pulling the lever due to their cam system, with a big amount of stopping coming almost instantly afterwords. The Guide's tend to pull smoothly, letting you feel when your pads made contact, then applying more pressure to slow you down in a hurry. This lever pull isn't mushy or overly soft feeling, but has a solid feel when the pads contact. Although they don't have the overall initial stopping power the Shimano's tend to have, the Guide's have that power on tap within the modulation. The modulation there is nearly limitless, letting me crawl down trails, lock the wheels up entirely, or just scrub the smallest amount of speed. And the power the Guide's have is impressive. I wouldn't suggest forgetting that they will throw you OTB in a loose gravel parking lot.

I'm giving this a new paragraph because it's worth it. These brakes are actually quiet. Yes, you heard it here, quiet. No turkey gobble, no running water; Quiet. My set up is as follows: SC 5010, RS Pike, 180mm rotors f/r, Sinster-metal. Yes, I'm using a noisier pad material, but these brakes are quiet. Initial set up had a bit of noise, but during break in it faded away a bit. Once bedded, and ridden, the noise disappear. It's made some noise on me, during very low speed stuff or getting some water on the rotors, but not the typical noise we know and love from Avid/Sram. I'm tossing up the low speed noise to metal pads. You get the same noise from a Shimano or other company under the same circumstances.

Jury's out on the durability and reliability, but after a few weeks of riding, they're fine. I don't even have any brake rub or anything (but hey, I'm a mechanic). I'd imagine they'll be quite fine for a while, but I'm arguing the initial set up is key. After messing with so many Elixirs, I took extra precautions and throughly bleed the brakes, as well as lubricated the pistons in the caliper. I take these precautions of most other manufactures as well, however.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Frederick Watershed

Duration Product Used:   Few Weeks

Purchased At:   Germantown Cycles

Similar Products Used:   Avid Elixir 5's, CR's, and 9 Trails

Bike Setup:   Santa Cruz 5010 Alu, Rockshox Pike, XO1, Rockshox Reverb, Raceface cockpit and wheels, Specialized Butcher tires (tubeless),

Reviews 1 - 1 (1 Reviews Total)

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sram guide RSC review

ok so im seeing alot of threads about avids being hated and the sram guide brakes, so im putting the hate to rest because i just got my new guide brakes today and they work really good, good power and good modulation....i think sram finally got a good brake this year and finally got all the problems ... Read More »

Sram Guide RSC or Hopes

Looking to upgrade my avid's elixir. Narriwed to Sram Guide RSC or Hope Tech3 E4. Wich one of those would you take? Shimano is out of question for me. I dont want the on-off feeling and no mineral oil form me. Only DOT.Read More »

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