Park Tool TS-2 Professional Truing Stand Tools

4.4/5 (20 Reviews)
MSRP : $277.49


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Product Description

Park Tool TS-2.2 Professional Wheel Truing Stand: The world?s most popular wheel truing stand and the standard of the industry for 35 years is now, more than ever, the stand to choose for daily shop use. The new TS-2.2 combines time-tested


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Reviews 1 - 15 (20 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Tim from Humboldt, CA

Date Reviewed: December 11, 2007

Strengths:    sturdy, reliable, easy to use.

Weaknesses:    None noted

Bottom Line:   
If you're building wheels, or have a lot of bikes and are hard on wheels, a truing stand is almost a necessity. Once you learn how to true a wheel, the stand will pay for itself in a year or less. You'll be popular with your riding buddies too. The only thing your friends will appreciate more is if you brew your own beer.

I don't understand the point of suggesting the fact it needs to be mounted as a product weakness. It's simple, buy the mount built by Park, mount it to a bench, or build a portable mount of your own design. I don't see it as a product weakness, only a hindrance to users who need instructions to walk and chew gum at the same time.


I read a lot of complaints on previous reviews about alignment problems. Most of them seem to arise when the wheel has been removed and turned around and the reviewer finds the dish is no longer what they thought it was. Here's a secret tip for you guys. Mark the axle with a silver sharpie so it goes back in oriented the same way. If the axle is even slightly bent, and this is VERY common, it will change the position of the rim in relation to the uprights of the stand when installed in a different position. If the axle is bent, and you don't put it in the way it was, it's not going to line up, I guarantee it.

As professional mechanic, and a fan of Park Tools, I highly recommend the park TS-2 truing stand

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Similar Products Used:   N/A

Bike Setup:   N/A

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Ryan from Eugene, OR

Date Reviewed: February 2, 2006

Strengths:    Quality constuction; easy to use; gives you all the adjustments and references to build high quality wheels, nothing more, nothing less; mounts easily into a benchvise or bolts directly to a work bench; when properly adjusted, give an accurate measure of wheel dish; reference arms are wide enough to accomadate fat downhill MTB tires.

Weaknesses:    Was not properly aligned for wheel dish when I recieved it (instructions claim that this is done at the factory); out of the box, requires either a base sold separately by Park, or must be clamped in a bench vise or bolted to a bench (will not stand up on its own); 20mm axeled wheels require either an adapter or some measure of creativity to mount in the stand.

Bottom Line:   
I've actually used this particular stand in one variation or another for a few years while working at a few different shops. I've always found it plenty accurate and all that you really need for building and truing wheels. Radial and lateral truing, as well as dishing can be done accurately with this stand (provided it is adjusted properly).

When I first recieved my own stand, I was a little disappointed that the dishing was way off, especially since I needed to dish one of my boutique wheel sets (wasn't dished correctly at the factory, grrr.). I used one of the reference arms to dish the wheel by flipping it over in the stand and matching the gaps on each side. Once the wheel was dished, I used it to center the stand. Centering the stand is pretty straight-forward; the two locknuts that stabalize the dropout arms with the reference arms have to be loosened to shift the dropout arms for rough adjustment. The reference arms can then be shifted side to side for final fine adjustment. Took about 15 minutes to figure it out and get it adjusted to my liking.

This is probably the first stand that I have ever used that has actually been properly adjusted for dish. All the ones I've used at shops have had the dishing alignment messed up one way or another, and no one bothered to take the time to realign them. I've found dishing to be much easier in the stand than using a separate dishing tool.

The simplicity and durability further shows that working on or building wheels isn't rocket science and requires a tool that simply gives you a repeatable set of reference points and the durability to last years on end. Park hasn't changed this stand much over the last decade or so, and they shouldn't. For as long as wheels are built with separate rims, hubs and spokes, this, a spoke wrench and maybe a tensiometer are all you'll ever need. 5 stars overall and for value; though not the cheapest of stands out there, the test of time in numerous shops is all I need to justify the cost. I would highly recommend this to anyone who wants to get into wheel building over any of the cheaper consumer stands from Perforance or Nashbar (well, even Park makes a cheap consumer stand, forget that one too).

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   3 months


Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Kevin a Cross Country Rider from New Zealand

Date Reviewed: February 3, 2004

Strengths:    ease of use, good centering gages, sturdy

Weaknesses:    alignment problem others have reported can be solved by rotating the axels unit they are approx centred and then maarking with a whiteboard marker so that when you unwind the wheel and put it back it goes in exactly as before.
Most axels aren't the same all way round and wham the alignment goes out. when you rotate and mark it's the same each time you use it.
But you should use a dishing gauge also to be sure


Bottom Line:   
Great price stand, highly reccomended if you ride often and your friends will love you.
Do yourself a favour and use the park tensiometer for best results.
Lazer sharp wheels that last will be the result.
And also learning to build them helps....

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   anything technical

Duration Product Used:   1 Year

Price Paid:    $250.00

Similar Products Used:   brake blocks, shop truing stand, TS-2 and TS-3 (yummy)

Bike Setup:   ??????????????????????????????

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Wayne a Downhiller from nottingham, uk

Date Reviewed: April 15, 2002

Strengths:    All of what is said bellow.

Weaknesses:    I have found a small weakness with the wheel jig, I can't find a way to true up wheels with 20mm axles, it's ok with Hope hubs cause I have spare axles but it's a lot of work with other hubs and we dealt with loads of downhillers and dual riders who need true wheels.

Bottom Line:   
amazing kit

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   sssshhhh. It's a secret

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Price Paid:    $140.00

Purchased At:   I work in a cycle shop


Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:4
Submitted by JRC3 a Cross Country Rider from Woburn, MA

Date Reviewed: December 31, 2001

Strengths:    Industry standard, heavy duty construction, smooth operation. Allows precise adjustment of wheel once proper set-up is obtained.


Weaknesses:    Needs some kind of base or permanent mounting for stability, repeatable set-up is not "automatic"

Bottom Line:   
I have to agree with the reviewers here who have had dificulty with the automatic centering feature of this stand. Even if the stand is checked and adjusted to be on center as per the included instructions, every time you put a wheel in (even the same wheel, the same way around) it goes in different. When I first tried the stand, I put my front wheel in and trued it up sweet. To check the dish (and the set-up of the stand) I flipped it around, and it was off-center by 2-3mm. When I flipped it back, it was off again (different from the first time). I ended up buying a dishing tool (Park WAG-1) and adopting the following strategy:1)Use a perfectly dished wheel or the Park tool and the truing stand instruction sheet to make sure the stand is set up properly. 2)Use a dishing tool to check the wheel you are working on, and adjust it for proper dish BEFORE PUTTING IT IN THE TRUING STAND.3)Place the wheel in the truing stand and gently snug up the forks, as per the instructions. 4)Spin the wheel and tighten up the calipers to see if the rim is centered in the stand. If it is not, I have found that tightening or loosening the clamping pressure on the locknuts will move the rim right or left. Play with the adjusting knob until the rim is centered in the calipers. 5)True the wheel! It seems like a lot of fuss for a precision tool, but it really has to do with getting to know the stand, your wheels, and how they interact. Once you get your own system down, this stand allows you to really dial in your wheels.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   Less than 1 month

Price Paid:    $140.00

Purchased At:   Cambria

Similar Products Used:   The old "brake pads" system.


Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Eric a Cross Country Rider from Missouri

Date Reviewed: November 27, 2001

Strengths:    This is a tried and true piece of shop equipment

Weaknesses:    Takes an ounce of brains to get set up correctly

Bottom Line:   
There is nothing wrong with this truing stand. 99% of the shops in the world use this stand. The other 1% probably do and don't tell anyone. Everyone who needs a dishing tool with this stand just needs the stand aligned correctly. If you still can't get it together, you can just turn the wheel around. When you get it centered so that it is in the same spot, there you are. The bottom line, anyone who bags on this stand, shouldn't work on bikes!

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Purchased At:   LBS

Similar Products Used:   I'm a bike mechanic..try to find a shop that has something else.


Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Lester Browne a Cross Country Rider from Austin, TX, USA

Date Reviewed: October 29, 2001

Strengths:    Sturdy... takes wheel with or without tires... trues round, and lateral... adjustable (with optional base)... quickly adjustable... takes many different types of wheels.

Weaknesses:    Ummm...

Bottom Line:   
I've built some nice, laser sharp wheels with this stand and trued machine built wheels to near perfection. It wasn't mine but in a shop i worked at that saw heavy use of all four of these stands (well before I started working there) and never had one fail. It may work lose after a few years, but if that's the only thing that goes wrong then no complaining here. Bolt it to the end of a bench or sturdy surface and it's good to go. Not a finely machined peice of art, but if you know what you're doing, then it'll get the job done just fine. Nor is it a do-it-all-wunder-wheel-machine; used in combination with a decent dishing tool and spoke tensionometer ($$$), some long-lasting wheels will result.

And to the fellow below: learn how to true a wheel and use a dishing tool and you might have better luck with your stand. And good luck using your rubber, flakey, rounded out brake pads to true your wheels -- i'm sure your wheels will end up perfect.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   Any

Duration Product Used:   2 Years

Price Paid:    $140.00

Purchased At:   A Bike Shop

Similar Products Used:   n/a

Bike Setup:   n/a

Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:1
Submitted by Alex Marquis from Rochester, MN

Date Reviewed: August 4, 2001

Strengths:    It would seem like a good concept. Too bad the machining tolerances are totally sloppy.
Maybe some lucky folks get one that happens to be accurate.


Weaknesses:    The wheel rim is always off center (to the right). So I can't use it without a dishing tool.
What is the point of owning this tool if it can't both true and dish wheels?
Also heavy. Heavy does not make it accurate. It just makes it heavy. I'm not trying to true motorcycles wheels.
I'm sending mine back.


Bottom Line:   
What is the point of this expensive tool?
You could just as easily true against your brake pads or buy a cheap truing stand and a dishing tool. If you need perfect wheels (I do) you cannot get by with a TS-2.

This peice of junk is a waste of $ and metal.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   3 months

Price Paid:    $140.00

Purchased At:   PricePoint

Similar Products Used:   Trueing based on brake pads.

Bike Setup:   Kona Jake the snake w/ Mavic ma3 rims and Ultegra hubs.

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by squish a Weekend Warrior from aberdeen SD

Date Reviewed: October 17, 2000

Strengths:    excellent excellent stand...this stand has been in the shop i work at for more than 20 years...and still works like new...sure it's a little dirty and crusty...but it works...doesn't align very well anymore so we were forced to replace it...but the new one hasn't changed much...i might just have to shell out the cash to get one for home...

Weaknesses:    non that i can think of...

Bottom Line:   
for the money this is an excellent thing to have...especially in the shop...would be more than enough for at home use...common 25 years worth of shop use and it still works well...can't complain about that...most definatley worth the money...
five flamming turds the whole way around...
happy trails...

squish

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   anything off road

Duration Product Used:   More than 3 years

Price Paid:    $140.00

Purchased At:   i work at a shop...guess

Similar Products Used:   nothing worth mentioning

Bike Setup:   does this really apply??

Overall Rating:5
Submitted by Jeff a Cross-Country Rider from Weymouth, MA

Date Reviewed: May 3, 1999

Strengths:    
Easy to use. Almost fool-proof in set-up and operation.


Weaknesses:    
Need to attach it to a sturdy base or work bench.


Bottom Line:   
A great tool. If you're tired of going to the shop to get your wheels trued, buy this. It's the cost of a mail-order LX wheelset, but if you own this stand you'll double the life of your wheels.

Expand full review >>

Favorite Trail:   
Benji's Hill

Duration Product Used:   
3 months

Bike Setup:   
I bolted it to a piece of plywood 3 feet X 3 feet and it's perfect.

Overall Rating:4
Submitted by bikewimp a cross-country rider

Date Reviewed: January 18, 1999

Bottom Line:   


Great wheel building tool. I think this stand is a little difficult to align properly. I even bought a centering tool but still depend on a dishing tool for perfect alignment. The way that the collars are design leaves little room for fine adjustment. The build quality is excellent. If you are a serious bike geek then a park stand is a must tool. I will substract one star for fine alignment problems.

Overall Rating:5
Submitted by Alan Sherrill a weekend warrior from Watsonville, CA

Date Reviewed: December 30, 1998

Bottom Line:   


This tool more than pays for itself. At every wheel removal, true it up. Learn to build a wheel and you save $15 in labor. As with others, I use the dishing tool to better center the rim. Replacement parts are easy to get but I have needed nothing for mine in 14 years I have used it. Your bike buddies will love you for buying one.

Overall Rating:4
Submitted by James a cross-country rider from Columbus, Ohio

Date Reviewed: May 31, 1998

Bottom Line:   


Just got one of these as a b-day present.Solid. Allowed even a novice like me to true up a pair of wheels. (Only used the brakes to take out the big kinks before.) Wish all my tools were made this good. It is expensive. (Looks) durable, and does what it is supposed to, Almost perfect.

Overall Rating:3
Submitted by Len a weekend warrior from New York

Date Reviewed: September 3, 1997

Bottom Line:   


Built to last forever. The auto centering feature does not work if used with various width wheels. I would prefer that it had an easy to use manual centering feature, since it is a pain in the ass when it does not center properly, and there is no manual override. The use of a dishing tool is a must with this unit. Knowing what I know now I would probably get Park's cheaper stand which would avoid the auto-set problem, which really slows things up.

Overall Rating:4
Submitted by Mark D a cross-country rider from CA

Date Reviewed: July 17, 1997

Bottom Line:   


I have to agree 100% with Rod Hoadley about the stand not being centered. Once you put the wheel on the stand and get it tight you have to move the rim to get it in the middle. Other than that I would have to say that there is nothing wrong with the stand.

Reviews 1 - 15 (20 Reviews Total) | Next 15

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